body type

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type

 [tīp]
the general or prevailing character of any particular case, such as of a disease, person, or substance.
type A a behavior pattern characterized by excessive competitiveness and aggressiveness. See type A behavior.
asthenic type a constitutional type marked by a slender body, long neck, long, flat chest and abdomen, and poor muscular development.
athletic type a constitutional type marked by broad shoulders, deep chest, flat abdomen, thick neck, and good muscular development.
blood type
2. the phenotype of an individual with respect to a blood group system.
body type (constitutional type) a constellation of traits related to body build.
phage type a subgroup of a bacterial species susceptible to a particular bacteriophage and demonstrated by phage typing. Called also lysotype and phagotype.
pyknic type a constitutional type marked by rounded body, large chest, thick shoulders, broad head, and short neck.

body type

the general physical appearance of an individual human body. Three commonly used terms for body types are ectomorph, describing a thin, fragile physique; endomorph, denoting a round, soft body; and mesomorph, indicating a muscular, athletic body of average size. See also asthenic habitus, athletic habitus, ectomorph, endomorph, mesomorph, pyknic.

body type

Fringe endocrinology
A hypothesis advanced in 1983 by an American physician, Elliot Abravanel, MD, that a person’s body type is a function of the dominant endocrine organ, and that each type of person craves and overeats certain foods in an effort to stimulate that organ; according to this hypothesis, there are various forms of obesity and the role of the physician treating obesity is to determine the patient’s body type and tailor a diet and exercise plan that addresses the person’s body type.

body type

Classification of the human body according to muscle and fat distribution.
See: ectomorph; endomorph; mesomorph; somatotype
See also: type
References in periodicals archive ?
The body copy elsewhere is in Mercury Text, designed by Hoefler & Frere-Jones as a high-performance typeface for the newspaper industry.
We noted further text in the body copy stated "Specsavers employs more qualified optometrists" but we again considered this could have been misinterpreted to mean that they employed optometrists who were more qualified rather than they employed a larger number of qualified optometrists.
Body copy is often set in 12 points, which is often too large for two-or-three column newsletters.
Using candid, ivory-washed black-and-white photographs, the ads present people in joyous situations -- a beaming wedding party, a child on Christmas morning -- while the body copy relays the sentiments associated with the image shown.
Pay attention to elements such as the headline, subhead, body copy, demographic information, photos, and artwork.
We've also bumped up the size of the body copy in features and columns by a half point for enhanced readability and enlarged the Wood & Wood Products logo on the cover.
But the story's headline, lead paragraph and two-thirds of its body copy focused on the Peace Now settlement update.
Your headline will keep them reading into the body copy if the story is interesting.
Body copy should be kept as short as possible, and the brochure should not require the reader to wade through administrative detail as part of the overall camp story.
Developed by Boston-based Arnold Communications, the series of 8-10 ads uses deep, red-textured backgrounds and oversized product shots to achieve a distinctive visual feel, The executions include body copy that agency and client executives described as an "edgy" and "humorous" attempt to stand out in a crowded marketplace.
Levinson feels strongly that direct-response writing for the Web should have lots of "snappy headlines and relaxed body copy.
Using the established format of DK's "Chronicle" series - newspaper-style headline and body copy accompanied by photo - a team of editors, under Robyn Karney's leadership, has compiled an extremely enjoyable study of the film industry's first hundred years.