Lactobacillus acidophilus

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Lac·to·ba·cil·lus ac·i·doph·'i·lus

a bacterial species found in the feces of milk-fed infants and also in the feces of older persons on a high milk-, lactose-, or dextrin-containing diet.

Lactobacillus acidophilus

Etymology: L, lac, milk, bacillum, small rod, acidus, sour; Gk, philein, to love
a bacterium present in the intestinal tract and vagina, as well as in milk and dairy products. The strain is used to manufacture a fermented milk product. Generally considered to be beneficial because it produces vitamin K, lactase, and other antimicrobial substances when ingested. See also acidophilus milk.

Lactobacillus acidophilus

A bacterium present in yogurt and in the colon of infants. It is believed by some healthcare workers that the consumption of Lactobacillus acidophilus and L bulgaricus are of therapeutic value, as they prevent the overgrowth of opportunistic and/or potentially pathogenic bacteria and fungi. Lyophilised concentrates of Lactobacillus species are available commercially, and have been used to treat canker sores, colitis, diarrhoea, halitosis, oral thrush, and yeast and other infections.

Lactobacillus acidophilus

A bacterium in yogurt, and in the colon of infants; consumption of L acidophilus may be therapeutic as it prevents overgrowth of opportunistic and/or potentially pathogenic bacteria and fungi. See Yogurt.

Lac·to·ba·cil·lus ac·i·doph·i·lus

(lak'tō-bă-sil'ŭs as'i-dof'i-lŭs)
A bacterial species found in the feces of milk-fed infants and also in the feces of older people on a high milk-, lactose-, or dextrin-containing diet.

Lactobacillus acidophilus

A bacteria found in yogurt that changes the balance of the bacteria in the intestine in a beneficial way.
Mentioned in: Strep Throat

Lactobacillus acidophilus,

Lac·to·ba·cil·lus ac·i·doph·i·lus

(lak'tō-bă-sil'ŭs as'i-dof'i-lŭs)
A bacterial species found in the feces of milk-fed infants and also in the feces of older people on a high milk-, lactose-, or dextrin-containing diet.