blood transfusion

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blood transfusion

Etymology: AS, blod + L transfundere, to pour through
the administration of whole blood or a component, such as packed red cells, to replace blood lost through trauma, surgery, or disease.
method Needed equipment is gathered; physician order is reviewed; transfusion consent is completed; and blood component is obtained, verified, and inspected per institution protocol. It is extremely important that the blood component to be transfused is compatible with the individual receiving the transfusion and that the correct individual is receiving the transfusion. Once verification of product and individual is confirmed, the blood component is hung using the appropriate tubing and setup and infused. A piggybacked 0.9% normal saline solution is set up to follow the infusion or to flush the line in event of a transfusion reaction. Infusion must be completed in under 4 hours to prevent bacterial growth. Individuals must be carefully monitored for a transfusion reaction during infusion. Vital signs should be checked every 5 minutes along with checks for signs and symptoms such as fever, facial flushing, rapid thready pulse, cold clammy skin, itching, swelling at infusion site, dizziness, dyspnea, and low back or chest pain. (Stop infusion immediately at any sign of transfusion reaction.) After infusion, IV tubing is cleared with saline solution and the blood bag discarded according to institution policy.
outcome criteria No signs of transfusion reaction. (See transfusion reaction for appropriate interventions if reaction occurs.) Laboratory values show positive response to administration of blood component.
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Setup for blood administration

blood transfusion

The administration of blood—usually understood to mean a transfusion of packed red cells—to a recipient, to replace red cells or blood products lost due to severe bleeding.

blood transfusion

The transfer of blood or blood products from a donor into a recipient, usually to replace red cells or blood products lost through severe bleeding. See Autologous transfusion, Blood conserving therapy, Directed donation.

blood transfusion

The administration of blood, by instillation into a vein, to replace blood lost or to treat a failure of blood production. Before transfusion, the blood group of the recipient must be known and serum from the blood to be transfused is cross-matched with the recipient's blood cells to confirm compatibility. Sometimes the patient's own blood, collected at operation or obtained earlier, is used.

blood transfusion,

n the administration of whole blood or a component such as packed red cells to replace blood lost through trauma, surgery, or disease.

blood transfusion


blood transfusion transfusion reaction
see transfusion reaction.
References in periodicals archive ?
Currently there is a charge of e1/4200 for a blood transfusion for those not entitled to free medical care.
Approach: The programme provides advice on shaping the legal framework for safe blood transfusion services and the practical implementation of those services in the provinces.
In addition to patient demographic characteristics, admission status, diagnoses, procedures, present-on-admission, severity of illness, and a comprehensive set of comorbidities, detailed information about inpatient blood transfusion was available.
We hope that by better understanding how the body responds to the blood, we can make improvements to blood transfusions that will reduce the likelihood of inflammatory responses.
He said, the procedure has been implemented since last June at the Sharjah Blood Transfusion Centre, especially on routine blood tests to guarantee that the units are safe and free of infectious diseases.
As soon as the media reported, we constituted a high-level team, which consists of joint director blood transfusion, health services deputy director and etc.
One of the major problems, however - the iron overload in the body caused by the repeated blood transfusions -- still the remains the main cause for thalassaemia deaths.
Anita Baxter, aged 56, from Naas, in Co Kildare, suffered significant blood loss after having a tumour removed and died because she refused a blood transfusion.
Although this service evaluation study was small in scale and undertaken solely within Belfast Trust, it provides feedback from palliative care patients who received domiciliary blood transfusions.
To protect people in Central Asia from contaminated blood transfusions and related unsafe medical practices, a well-organized blood transfusion service, with quality control systems in all areas, must be established.
Pre-operative oral iron supplementation reduces blood transfusion in colorectal surgery--a prospective, randomised, controlled trial.
In addition, cancer patients not receiving chemotherapy died sooner and did not have any fewer blood transfusions when ESAs were given according to the dosing recommendations for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy.