blood protein


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blood protein

Etymology: AS, blod + Gk, proteios, of first rank
any of the large variety of proteins normally found in the blood, such as albumin, globulin, hemoglobin, and proteins bound to hormones or other compounds. See also plasma protein, serum protein.

blood protein

A broad term encompassing numerous proteins, including hemoglobin, albumin, globulins, the acute-phase reactants, transporter molecules, and many others. Normal values are hemoglobin, 13 to 18 g/dL in men and 12 to 16 g/dLl in women; albumin, 3.5 to 5.0 g/dL of serum; globulin, 2.3 to 3.5 g/dL of serum. The amount of albumin in relation to the amount of globulin is referred to as the albumin-globulin (A/G) ratio, which is normally 1.5:1 to 2.5:1.
See also: protein
References in periodicals archive ?
Researchers at the university's Cancer Research UK Institute for Cancer Studies worked with a team of specialists in Paris in devising a test which examines more than 100 blood proteins.
Soy flour can't be used one for one in place of blood protein in glue because soy flour contains less protein than the animal blood.
Can a blood protein that may inhibit myelin repair in MS be overridden to spur repair?
Cindy further commented: "Due to its high histidine specificity, MaxiPro HSP has proven to be particularly efficient in removing the heme part from the blood protein hemoglobin.
Laboratory tests showed that it binds especially easily to the human version of the blood protein.
Albumen is the most prevalent naturally occurring blood protein in the human circulatory system.
But the body makes the molecule naturally in small amounts when an enzyme called heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) breaks down a portion of the blood protein hemoglobin.
Two new studies show that variations in a blood protein called MBL can predict how bad infections will be during drug treatment for leukemia and other cancers.
They discovered that a common blood protein, plasminogen, sticks to rogue prions but ignores the normal variety.
Fibrinogen, a blood protein crucial to natural clotting, is an important component of so-called "sealant" products to control bleeding in patients suffering from trauma or undergoing surgery.
Elderly hip fracture patients have lower blood protein levels than other elderly hospital patients.
To study the impact of adapting to low-protein intakes, the researchers measured the women's muscle function, their body composition, and their immune response - in addition to blood protein levels and nitrogen balance - to detect any changes.