blister pack

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blister pack

A disposable package consisting of a clear plastic overlay affixed to a cardboard backing for protecting and displaying a product.

blister pack

, blister package
A method of protecting individual doses of medications within a transparent cavity or cell made from a dome-shaped plastic barrier. The barrier separates one dose from another, protects the medication from moisture, and keeps it from being crushed or damaged during transportation or storage. Each dose of the medication can be individually released or unwrapped without affecting the integrity of the neighboring doses.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bang & Olufsen Medicom smart blisterpack dispenser
Kuopio University Hospital blisterpack with electronic feedback buttons
National Institutes of Health/Fisher Scientific compliance monitoring blisterpack for Azithromycin trials, made by Information Mediary
They come in handy blisterpacks with display setups available and are another natural impulse/accessory purchase.
But you'll have noticed that sociobiologists like Wilson and biologist/geologists like Gould--not to mention industrial psychologists, cultural anthropologists, molecular physicists, Big Bang cosmologists, genetic engineers, biomystical Inner Children/Dolphin Symps and the latest Cardin style of deconstructed French fry, and not even to think about downloaded cyberpunks and zippies, the canned opinionizers in the Beltway blisterpacks on the TV yak-shows, a vampire bat like Ross Perot, or Barbra Streisand and the dead Elvis--have usurped the discourse that used to be, prior to the modern age, the exclusive property of .
The tagging of the packs of blisterpacks and the plastic bottles used by patients is primarily a US phenomenon driven by the need for improved anticounterfeiting but there will be great improvements in theft deterrence and improved stock control and recalls.
For example, RFID enabled compliance monitoring blisterpacks are newly popular.
In particular, where tags will be used in very large numbers at item level, such as the small plastic bottles and blisterpacks of drugs in the home and hospital laundry, there is an ongoing debate concerning which RFID technology will "win" in the sense of being responsible for most tags sold - no one technology is expected to perform all tasks at item level.