blending inheritance

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Related to Blending hypothesis: Particulate inheritance

blend·ing in·her·i·tance

galtonian term for inheritance in which no component is conspicuous or obtrusive.

blending inheritance

(blĕn′dĭng)
n.
The discredited theory that inheritance of traits from two parents produces offspring with characteristics that are intermediate between those of the parents.

blending inheritance

the apparent fusion in offspring of distinct, dissimilar characteristics of the parents. Blended characteristics are usually of a quantitative nature, such as height, and fail to segregate in successive generations. The phenomenon is the result of multiple pairs of genes that have a cumulative effect. See also polygene.

blending inheritance

a pre-20th century theory that the male and female GAMETES each contained essences from the various parts of the parental body, which were mixed at fertilization to produce offspring showing some features of both parents. The theory was backed up by results from crosses involving quantitative characters (see POLYGENIC INHERITANCE in which there was an apparent mixing of PHENOTYPES due to segregation of polygenes. However, the idea of blending was overtaken by the discoveries of MENDEL and his laws of particulate inheritance.
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