bleeder

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bleeder

 [blēd´er]
1. any blood vessel cut during surgery that requires clamping, cautery, or ligature.
2. slang term, now considered offensive, referring to a person who bleeds freely, especially one suffering from a condition in which the blood fails to clot properly, such as hemophilia.

bleed·er

(blēd'er),
1. Colloquialism for anyone suffering from hemophilia, Christmas disease, Osler disease, or another clotting disorder.
2. A blood vessel cut during a surgical procedure.

bleeder

/bleed·er/ (blēd´er)
1. one who bleeds freely.
2. any blood vessel cut during surgery that requires clamping, ligature, or cautery.

bleeder

(blē′dər)
n.
1. A person, such as a hemophiliac, who bleeds freely or is subject to frequent hemorrhages.
2.
a. Slang A blood vessel from which there is uncontrolled bleeding.
b. A blood vessel severed by trauma or surgery that requires cautery or ligature to arrest the flow of blood.
3. A person who draws blood from another; a phlebotomist.

bleeder

Usage notes: (informal)
1 a person who has hemophilia or any other vascular or hematologic condition associated with a tendency to hemorrhage.
2 a blood vessel that bleeds, especially one cut during a surgical procedure.
Surgery
(1) An actively haemorrhaging patient
(2) A patient whose marrow has been ravaged by chemotherapy, and is thus highly susceptible to bleeding due to marked thrombocytopenia—e.g., < 10,000 platelets/mm3
(3) An overtly haemorrhaging blood vessel in an operative or endoscopic field
Vox populi Phlebotomist

bleeder

Surgery noun
1. An actively hemorrhaging Pt.
2. A Pt whose BM has been ravaged by chemotherapy, and is thus highly susceptible to bleeding due to marked thrombocytopenia–eg, < 10,000 platelets/mm3.
3. An overtly hemorrhaging blood vessel in an operative or endoscopic field. Cf 'Clotter' Vox populi Phlebotomist, see there.

bleed·er

(blē'dĕr)
1. A person with a hemorrhagic disease.
2. A blood vessel severed during surgery.

bleeder

1. A person with HAEMOPHILIA or other bleeding disorder.
2. A person unduly prone to bleed.
3. A surgeon's term for an artery cut during an operation.

bleed·er

(blē'dĕr)
A blood vessel cut during a surgical procedure.

bleeder

1. the popular term for an animal who bleeds freely, especially one suffering from a condition in which the blood fails to clot properly such as in hemophilia. In horses the term means one which bleeds from the nostrils during a race. Such horses are not allowed to participate in races. See also epistaxis.
2. any large blood vessel cut during surgery.
References in periodicals archive ?
When the pack failed to control the epistaxis the patient would be taken to theatre for localisation of the bleeder and diathermy, or endoscopic sphenopalatine artery ligation.
Forty-eight (73%) of 66 patients in our study required two or more units of blood by transfusion, and were representative of severe GI bleeders.
There was no significant difference between the bleeders and nonbleeders with respect to surgical indication (figure 3).
It makes more sense to suction or sponge away the blood and then cover the bleeder with a lap pad and slowly roll the pad away Then, just as the site starts to bleed, use the cautery This directly targets the bleeder and avoids boiling a large area.
com/healthcare) announced that Siemens has entered into an exclusive government contract today with the Defense Advance Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop a prototype Deep Bleeder Acoustic Coagulation cuff (DBAC)*, a life-saving ultrasound device limiting blood loss and shock resulting from combat limb injuries.
Bleeders are clamped and suture-ligated, which is less traumatic to the musculature than heavy electrocoagulation; good hemostasis is essential.
Boy bands and cheer-leaders, homophobes and ear bleeders, American misplaced anger.
The company plans to aggressively develop and market therapeutic solutions for GERD (gastro-esophageal reflux disease) via this approach, as well as treatment of GI bleeders.
Schoeneweis was frustrated because many of the hits he gave up during a five-run sixth inning were bloopers or bleeders that found a hole.
Cheeky foreign bleeders," I said to the fat bulldog with a George cross tattooed on his neck, standing next to me at the bar.