blackout

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Related to Blackout (disambiguation): Blackouts, blacking out

blackout

 [blak´owt″]
temporary loss of vision and momentary unconsciousness due to diminished circulation to the brain and retina. Blackout refers specifically to a condition which sometimes occurs in aviators resulting from increased acceleration, which causes a decrease in blood supply to the brain cells. The term can also refer to other forms of temporary loss of consciousness and to fainting, as well as to temporary loss of memory and to certain forms of vertigo.
alcoholic blackout anterograde amnesia experienced by alcoholics during episodes of drinking, even when not fully intoxicated; it is indicative of early but still reversible brain damage.

black·out

(blak'owt),
1. Temporary loss of consciousness due to decreased blood flow to the brain.
2. Momentary loss of consciousness, as in absence.
3. Temporary loss of vision, without alteration of consciousness, due to positive g (gravity) forces; caused by temporary decreased blood flow in the central retinal artery, and seen mostly in aviators.
4. A transient episode that occurs during a state of intense intoxication (alcoholic blackout) of which the person has no recall, despite apparently having been conscious at the time.

blackout

/black·out/ (-out) loss of vision and momentary lapse of consciousness due to diminished circulation to the brain and retina.
alcoholic blackout  anterograde amnesia experienced by alcoholics during episodes of drinking, even when not fully intoxicated; indicative of early, reversible brain damage.

blackout

(blăk′out′)
n.
1. The concealment or extinguishment of lights that might be visible to enemy aircraft during an air raid.
2. A temporary loss of memory or consciousness.

blackout

Usage notes: (informal)
a temporary loss of vision or consciousness.
A sign of early chronic alcohol or other substance abuse, characterised as an episode of total amnesia lasting from hours to days after a period of intense drinking or alcohol binge; blackouts may be due to alterations in central serotoninergic neurotransmission, as these patients have decreased plasma levels of tryptophan

blackout

Neurology A sign of early chronic alcohol or other substance abuse, characterized as an episode of total amnesia lasting from hrs to days after a period of intense drinking or alcohol binge; blackouts may be due to alterations in central serotoninergic neurotransmission, as these Pts have ↓ plasma levels of tryptophan

black·out

(blak'owt)
1. Temporary loss of consciousness due to decreased blood flow to the brain.
See also: syncope
2. Momentary loss of consciousness as in an absence.
3. Temporary loss of vision, without alteration of consciousness, due to positive (above normal) g (gravity) forces; caused by temporary decreased bloodlow in the central retinal artery, and seenmostly in aviators.
4. A transient episode that occurs during a state of intense intoxication (alcoholic blackout) for which the person has no recall, although not unconscious (as observed by others).

blackout

A common term for a temporary loss of vision or consciousness. This may be a harmless fainting attack or a brief period of visual loss caused by standing up suddenly. Both are due to transient shortage of blood to the brain (cerebral ischaemia).

blackout 

Synonym for amaurosis fugax. It also includes the temporary loss of vision and consciousness occurring in unprotected pilots, due to a reduction of blood supply to the eye and brain at high acceleration. See amaurosis fugax.

black·out

(blak'owt)
1. Temporary loss of consciousness due to decreased blood flow to the brain.
2. A transient episode that occurs during a state of intense intoxication.

blackout,

n the brief impairment of short- and long-term memory occurring during episodes of excessive alcohol consumption or of other substance abuse; consciousness is retained.

Patient discussion about blackout

Q. What does depression cause? and how can i get out of the black hole i got my self into ...?

A. What does it cause: a loss of interest in things that were previously routine, withdrawal for social situations, withdrawal from friends and family, avoiding confrontations, avoiding stressful situations, diffuculty making decisions, feelings of deep despair and sadness, unhealthy guilt. The list does not end there.

How do I get out of this hole: See your medical doctor for evaluation and followup routinely. Take your medication on time everyday. Be patient with yourself. Try to let go of unneccessary guilt, or resentments and anger from past experiences. Forgive others who may have hurt you. Forgive them from your heart. Try to make amends to others you may have hurt. Take time in your day to reflect on things and try to resolve to do better. Don't give up. If you fall down, get back up and go at it again. A good nights sleep is very beneficial. So is exercise or physical activity. Walking is very good.

Q. Does anyone have information on Bipolar "blackouts" or know what they're really called? My boyfriend is bipolar and experienced a blackout a few weeks ago during which he did something completely out of character. A crime was committed and he has since been arrested. He's having trouble coping as he has no memory of the crime. He was on Wellbuterin and a doctor prescribed steroids and vicodin for a crushed disc. The chemicals may have led him into this blackout. He is a wonderful loving person and is now facing a life sentence for this terrible thing that happened that he had no conscious control over. They will not continue his medications in jail and he is not receiving mental or medical treatment. Is there anyone out there that can help me find some answers?

A. i never heard of such thing. but there are strange results sometimes from mixing drugs that affect the central nervous system. here is for instance a web page talking about interactions between Vicodin and Wellbutrin.

http://www.drugs.com/drug_interactions.php

More discussions about blackout