blackhead

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blackhead

 [blak´hed″]
a plug of keratin and sebum within the dilated orifice of a hair follicle. The dark color is caused not by dirt but by the discoloring effect of air on the sebum in the clogged pore. Infection may cause it to develop into a pustule or boil. See also acne vulgaris. Called also open comedo.

blackhead

/black·head/ (blak´hed) open comedo.

blackhead

(blăk′hĕd′)
n.
1. A skin lesion consisting of a hair follicle that is occluded with sebum and keratin, appearing black at the surface.
2. An infectious disease of turkeys and some wildfowl that is caused by a protozoan (Histomonas meleagridis) and results in lesions of the intestine and liver. Also called enterohepatitis, histomoniasis, infectious enterohepatitis.

blackhead

See comedo.

blackhead

A blocked sebaceous gland which is open to air, where the secretions oxidise, turning black.

blackhead

Open comedo A blocked sebaceous gland which is open to air, where the secretions oxidize, turning black. Cf Whitehead.

his·to·mo·ni·a·sis

(his'tō-mŏ-nī'ă-sis)
A disease chiefly affecting turkeys, caused by Histomonas meleagridis and characterized by ulcerative and necrotic lesions of the liver and cecum, acute onset, and a high mortality rate. It is transmitted inside the eggs of the nematode Heterakis gallinae, which is primarily responsible for maintaining and spreading the infection.
Synonym(s): blackhead (2) .

o·pen com·e·do

(ō'pĕn kom'ĕ-dō)
A comedo with a wide opening on the skin surface capped with a melanin-containing blackened mass of epithelial debris.
Synonym(s): blackhead (1) .

blackhead

An accumulation of fatty sebaceous material in a sebaceous gland or hair follicle, with oxidation of the outer layer, causing a colour change from white to dark brown or black. Blackheads, or comedones, occur in the skin disorder ACNE.

Blackhead

A plug of fatty cells capped with a blackened mass.
Mentioned in: Rosacea

Patient discussion about blackhead

Q. I have this blackhead on my cheek area for about a year..,How do I remove it?

A. This type of blackhead you are describing sounds like comedonal (non-inflammatory) acne, as opposed to acne that is inflammatory or severe inflammatory (which usually will not remain for a year on the skin). There are many basic local treatments which can be found at pharmacies over-the-counter. Whether it is gel or cream (which are rubbed into the pores over the affected region), bar soaps or washes - it is important to keep the skin clean of bacteria, that may worsen blackheads.

More discussions about blackhead
References in periodicals archive ?
To encourage teens to look picture-perfect in school yearbook photos this year, and to kick-off the launch of the CLEAN & CLEAR(R) Advantage(R) Blackhead Eraser(TM) Exfoliating Cleanser, CLEAN & CLEAR(R) is inviting teens to "Erase Their Worst Year Book Picture" at a pop-up photo studio in Times Square; New York City.
Another common myth is that dirty skin causes acne; however, blackheads and other acne lesions are not caused by dirt.
for treating mild acne contain sulfur, salicylic acid or resorcinol, which help dry up the whiteheads and blackheads.
Some get only a few blackheads and pimples, while other may be affected more severely.
A retinoid cream like Isotrex from your GP could be very helpful because it is thought to help unblock the pores causing blackheads.
If you are battling with blackheads then Clearasil claim to have the answer with their new range of blackhead busting products.
The blackheads must not be allowed to disfigure our most beautiful and famous asset.
But he has embraced skin treatments to remove the blackheads from his skin and smooth bumps caused by years of shaving because he sees that they work.
Newly minted teens are discovering dating, trying to pass chemistry, and facing the awful full-frontal fallout of their surging hormones, including breakouts, blemishes, and blackheads.
Face it, blocked pores and blackheads are unsightly and disgusting.
Q: Whiteheads, blackheads, pimples--what's the difference?