African American

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African American

An American citizen with origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa.

African American

Multiculture A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa. See Race.

Patient discussion about African American

Q. does anyone know of any really good salons in germany for african american hair?

A. Germany is quite big, but here (http://www.afrika-start.de/afroshop-lokal.htm
) you can find an "afro-shop" according to your location, and here (http://www.hairfinder.com/salonsgermany.htm) is a list of hair salons sorted by zip code.

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References in periodicals archive ?
According to Phill Wilson, Founder and Executive Director of BAI and coordinator of the African American Leader's Delegation, it is only by mobilizing all corners of Black America that AIDS can be overcome.
The Covenant fists facts and charts very familiar to those who regularly read the National Urban League's State of Black America annual reports.
By highlighting both the progress we've made and the predicaments we face, previous and this year's issue of The State of Black America seek to spur a deeper, more comprehensive examination of the status of African Americans in order to improve the possibility that they and all other Americans can fully participate in the American mainstream," he added.
Choose Black America was formed because black citizens of America have been disproportionately harmed by mass illegal immigration and fear seeing their interests further decimated by the amnesty legislation that was approved by the Senate.
There is no Democratic Party without black America.
It's not as if Clinton's reputation in black America was ever in danger.
The plenary session participants include (unless otherwise noted, all article titles are from the National Urban League's The State of Black America 2003):
DETROIT, June 16 /PRNewswire/ -- His book on Black America topped the Borders, Barnes & Noble, USA Today, and the New York Times book lists, and his meetings have brought thousands together to discuss "How can we make Black America better?
But to limit his accomplishments to his impact on black America, as mainstream media outlets did in covering the news of his passing, would be a grave disservice to his legacy.
Quite the contrary, Black America was not free from the futuristic vogue that began with the technological advances of the early 20th century.
The statistic that bedevils black America is this: 68.
The Million Man March had proved that no public figure had his finger better placed on the pulse of black America than Louis Farrakhan.

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