Bithynia


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Bithynia

[bəthin′ē·ə]
a genus of snails, species of which act as intermediate hosts to Opisthorchis.

Bithynia

a genus of snails that act as intermediate hosts for the miracidia of the Opisthorchis spp. of bile duct flukes.
References in periodicals archive ?
59) Tryphon, a Bosporan nauarch of Cotys II, celebrated a victory over the Scythians in 123 and later in 193 Sauromates II of Bosporus (173/4-210/11) defeated the Sarmatian Siraci and Scythians somewhere east of the Strait of Kerch and brought the Crimean Tauri into a treaty, thus (as he claimed) rendering the sea free for voyages to Pontus and Bithynia.
Tacitus' portrayal fails to consider that Marcellus' case came at a time when extortionate proceedings in the provinces, such as Bithynia, roused Tiberius tremendously.
Petronius Arbiter Governor of Bithynia Died (by his own hand) AD 65
Pliny, or Plinius Secundus, is the newly appointed governor of Bithynia, struggles to solve the murder of a high Roman official in a deserted location far from his capital.
Eventually, Sulla accepted him and, at age 18, he was sent as a diplomat to the court of King Nicomedes of Bithynia.
Mollusc shells, among which Bithynia tentaculata is most abundant, are present in substantial numbers at the upper limit of the unit.
An appendix helpfully lists the concurring royal dynasties of Macedonia, the Seleukids, the Ptolemies, Pergamon, Bithynia, Pontos, and Kappadokia.
32) Pliny records that the summae honorariae of new councillors at Claudiopolis in Bithynia were spent on new baths (Epist.
In this context it is not so strange that in the literary work of Petronius, a pagan author who was close to Nero and to his court and was proconsul of Bithynia (probably an already Christianized region at the beginning of the Sixties of the first century, as is clear from Pliny's well-known letter to Trajan on the Christian question), and on the other hand was interested in certain aspects of the Judaic culture, although from a critical point of view, (13) around the year A.
While there, he is said to have developed an indecent relationship with the king of Bithynia, a powerful kingdom in northern Asia Minor.
10) Emilia Bithynia, Lady Hornby, Constantinople during the Crimean War (London: Bentley, 1863), p.