mechlorethamine

(redirected from Bis(2-chloroethyl)methylamine)

mechlorethamine

 [mek″lor-eth´ah-mēn]
an alkylating agent that produces interstrand and intrastrand cross-linkages in DNA with resultant miscoding, breakage, and failure of replication. Used primarily for the treatment of disseminated hodgkin's disease, especially in the MOPP treatment regimen, and for other lymphomas, including mycosis fungoides; administered intravenously as the hydrochloride salt. Called also nitrogen mustard.

mechlorethamine

/mech·lor·eth·amine/ (mek″lor-eth´ah-mēn) one of the nitrogen mustards, used in the form of the hydrochloride salt as an antineoplastic, particularly in disseminated Hodgkin's disease.

mechlorethamine

A nitrogen mustard derivative which binds to DNA, crosslinking both strands to prevent its replication.

Global village
Mechlorethamine was first developed as a chemical weapon.

Oncology
A nitrogen mustard alkylating agent used for managing lymphomas; part of MOPP.
 
Adverse effects
Nausea, vomiting, marrow suppression, skin vesiculation at injection site.

mechlorethamine

Oncology An alkylating nitrogen mustard chemotherapeutic used for lymphomas Adverse effects GI Sx, BM suppression, skin vesiculation at injection site. See MOPP regimen.

ni·tro·gen mus·tards

(HN) (nī'trŏ-jĕn mŭs'tărdz)
A group of toxic chemicals developed for use as chemical-warfare agents.

mechlorethamine