bipedalism

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Related to Bipedal locomotion: bipedally

bipedalism

a mode of locomotion found in many primates (particularly man) and birds, in which only the hind limbs are used in walking. True bipedalism (i.e. where locomotion is normally bipedal) has required evolutionary changes to the vertebral column and pelvis, with their associated musculature. A principal advantage of bipedalism would seem to be that the forelimbs can become modified for a nonwalking function, e.g. tool handling in man, flight in birds.

bipedalism

habitual weight-bearing and locomotion on paired lower limbs
References in periodicals archive ?
Evidence from living primates also suggests that the provision of supporting rocky structures might make the acquisition of bipedal locomotion easier even if the ancestral hominin was not pre-adapted for it.
Fossils, feet and the evolution of human bipedal locomotion.
We also found that in 75 per cent of our observations of orangutan bipedal locomotion along branches, they used their hands for stabilisation, as do chimpanzees (Hunt 1996; Stanford 2006).
First, they suggested that we studied bipedal posture and not bipedal locomotion.
Gen Suwa, an anthropologist from the University of Tokyo Museum, have overturned the common assumption that manual dexterity evolved after the development of bipedal locomotion freed hominid hands to use fingers for tool manipulation.
Of the 22 characters for which AL 288-1 exhibits the humanlike state, 12 (55%) are found on the vertebral column, pelvis, and lower limb and could therefore be construed as related to upright bipedal locomotion, whereas 10 (45%) are found on the jaw, teeth, and upper limb and are therefore unrelated to upright bipedal locomotion.