biotope

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bi·o·tope

(bī'ō-tōp),
The smallest geographic area providing uniform conditions for life; the physical part of an ecosystem.
[G. bios, life, + topos, place]

biotope

[bī′ətōp]
Etymology: Gk, bios + topos, place
a specific biological habitat or site.

biotope

The smallest ecosystem, which is characterised by homogeneity of the environmental conditions and types of organisms.

bi·o·tope

(bī'ō-tōp)
The smallest geographic area providing uniform conditions for life; the physical part of an ecosystem.
[G. bios, life, + topos, place]

biotope

a whole or part of any habitat defined by the dominant organisms which live in it; for example, heather moor.

biotope

an area of land surface that provides uniform conditions over its entire surface for animal and plant life.
References in periodicals archive ?
In their present form, the clearance cairns belong among the cultural landscape biotopes rich in plant species.
Percentage of plant species available by biotopes in study area and their occurrence in Mourning dove diet
15] signal for the five studied echinoids of hardground biotopes varied from 5.
nitedula nests and found optimal height of nests in both forest biotopes was 2-3 m above the ground surface (Fig.
The biotope of the found species being analyzed was called a single location.
European Committee supports and co-finances environmentally oriented projects also in military environment with the aim to ensure that the situation of biotopes and species significant for Europe does not worsen.
Biotope structure analysis identifies and classifies different ecologically valuable biotopes in urban landscapes (Lovenhaft et al.
Immature stages were collected using the dipping method of Service (10) and each larval biotope was characterized quantitatively by means of a portable multi-parameter for studying the chemical proprieties of water collections.
The specifications, crucial for effective data-sharing, cover 25 themes, including land cover, land use, natural risk zones, atmospheric conditions, meteorological geographical features, sea regions, habitats and biotopes, energy and mineral resources and safety.
The insect species, caught by pitfall traps, which were set up in five different biotopes, were tested using the Indicator Species Analysis to find out whether they have indicator values for habitat description.