biosemiotics

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biosemiotics

An interdisciplinary science that studies communication and signalling in living systems.
References in periodicals archive ?
These reflections from Hominescence (2001) in addition to the above epitextual comments are clearly a reflection of a biosemiotic view of communication.
Dix, arguing ontologically that nature invented biosemiosis and that the emergence of life is fundamentally a semiotic process, seeks to identify what he calls life's biosemiotic 'causal signature'.
In "The Systemic Approach, Biosemiotic Theory, and Ecocide in Australia"
Her implied argument is that because human verbal language is biosemiotic, or inseparable from or constituted by the "biological language of the immune system and its conversations with the nervous system and the brain, and the endocrine system," it crosses over into other-than-human worlds or shares with the sign systems of other species (Wheeler 142).
The understanding that all living systems are semiotic allows us to understand more clearly that human semiosis--natural in scents and some expressions, gestures and symptoms, naturo-cultural in other gestures and symptoms, verbal and nonverbal in culture--is an evolutionary development from biosemiotic nature.
In effect, the biosemiotic insight that "signs are not added onto the bios, but rather that the latter emerges with and from mnemosemiotic process and formalizations" (Cohen 2011, 110) lends support to a reading of the intensifying human degradation of the biosphere, and accompanying modes of denial and false consciousness, in terms derived from de Man's own radical engagements with semiosis.
Among the topics are biology is immature biosemiotics, the semiotics of emergent levels of life, a biosemiotic perspective on the multitrophic plant-herbivore-parasitoid-pathogen system, semiosphere is the relational biosphere, and a roundtable on (mis)understanding of biosemiotics.
Ecosemiotics, on its hand, relates to ecological relations and complexity in general and human-nature relations in particular, as seen from a biosemiotic point of view.
Topics include a review of trait meta-mood research; the effects of perception on mode choice; psychology of the child with rheumatic disease; modulation of ongoing and cognitive behaviors of distributed neural networks through tonic- and phasic-release of norepinephrine; assessment of instructional effectiveness of Internet activities for enhancing course content at institutional and intra-personal levels of analysis; a comparative neuropsychological approach to cognitive assessment in clinical populations; forensic old age psychiatry; smoking and psychosocial health among adolescents; evolutionary psychology, social construction, and a biosemiotic proposal for symmetry; and the influence of body weight and shape in determining female and male physical attractiveness.
The first chapter intend to show communication in plants under the biosemiotic paradigm, which involves sign processes that are realized among plants of different species, plants with other organisms, and also among cells, and, even, in cells of the same plant.
For example, the concept of redundance is considered in linguistic studies of the utterance, in text semiotics as well as in biosemiotic studies of the genetic code.