biopsychosocial model

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bi·o·psy·cho·social mod·el

a conceptual model that assumes that psychological and social factors must also be included along with the biologic in understanding a person's medical illness or disorder.

biopsychosocial model

A theoretical framework that posits that biological, psychological and social factors all play a significant role in human disease or illness and health, rather than biology alone.

bi·o·psy·cho·so·cial mod·el

(bī'ō-sī'kō-sō'shăl mod'ĕl)
A conceptual model that assumes that psychological and social factors must also be included along with the biologic in understanding a person's medical illness or disorder.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Ideally, consultants should have knowledge of the culture of origin of patients with depression, within a holistic biopsychosocial approach to disease management.
The biopsychosocial approach to chronic pain: Scientific advances and future directions.
Finally, for patients suffering from ED it is generally recognized by the urologist that a biopsychosocial approach is needed that goes beyond the prescription of pro-erectile agents to include counselling on models of incorporating pro-erectile agents into regular sexual activity.
Readers will learn the effectiveness of the ICFs biopsychosocial approach for conceptualising and classifying mental health functioning (body functions and structures), disability (activity, limitations and participation restrictions), environmental barriers, and facilitators; collaborating with the person who is being assessed in determining these factors (personal factors), targeting interventions, and evaluating treatment efficacy.
The biopsychosocial approach (Engel, 1977) is a philosophy that encourages clinicians to understand health subjectively in terms of the complete human experience, cultural, social, and psychological (Borrell-Carrio, Suchman, & Epstein, 2004).
This textbook for an intro undergraduate course highlights health psychology's biopsychosocial approach.
We psychiatrists should take a biopsychosocial approach to assessing our padents.
Readers will examine the utility of the ICF's biopsychosocial approach for conceptualizing and classifying mental health functioning (body functions and structures), disability (activity limitations and participation restrictions), environmental barriers, and facilitators; collaborating with the person being assessed in determining these factors (personal factors), targeting interventions, and evaluating treatment efficacy.
This perspective fits well with social work's biopsychosocial approach to understanding and ameliorating complex social problems and its commitment to social justice.
He provides an overview of the ICF in the context of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision, including the ICF's biopsychosocial approach for classifying mental health functioning, disability, environmental barriers, and facilitators, and collaborating with the patient, targeting interventions, and evaluating treatment efficacy.
The authors use a biopsychosocial approach to presenting information about the prevention, causes, and treatments of obesity and address the manifestation and course of obesity in both children and adults.
The importance of this biopsychosocial approach, whether one looks at disorders of desire, arousal or orgasm, is supported by intercultural comparisons, among other data.