biophysics

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biophysics

 [bi″o-fiz´iks]
the science dealing with the application of physical methods and theories to biological problems. adj., adj biophys´ical.

bi·o·phys·ics

(bī-ō-phyz'iks),
1. The study of biologic processes and materials by means of the theories and tools of physics; the application of physical methods to analyze biologic problems and processes.
2. The study of physical processes (for example, electricity, luminescence) occurring in organisms.

biophysics

/bio·phys·ics/ (bi″o-fiz´iks) the science dealing with the application of physical methods and theories to biological problems.biophys´ical

biophysics

(bī′ō-fĭz′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The science that deals with the application of physics to biological processes and phenomena.

bi′o·phys′i·cal adj.
bi′o·phys′i·cal·ly adv.
bi′o·phys′i·cist n.

biophysics

the application of physical laws to life processes of organisms.

biophysics

The science that applies the methods of physics to biological systems.

Examples
Structural biology, molecular dynamics, neural networkds, quantum biophysics.

bi·o·phys·ics

(bī'ō-fiz'iks)
1. The study of biologic processes and materials by means of the theories and tools of physics.
2. The study of physical processes (e.g., electricity, luminescence) occurring in organisms.

biophysics

The physics of biological processes and systems.

biophysics

the physics of biological processes and the application of methods used in physics to biology.

biophysics,

n 1. the principles of physics applied to biological events.
2. the investigation of physical pro-cesses taking place in living organisms, such as electrical or magnetic events.

bi·o·phys·ics

(bī'ō-fiz'iks)
1. The study of biologic processes and materials by means of the theories and tools of physics.
2. The study of physical processes (e.g., electricity, luminescence) occurring in organisms.

biophysics (bīōfiz´iks),

n the science dealing with the forces that act on living cells of the body, the relationship between the biologic behavior of living structures and the physical influences to which they are subjected, and the physics of vital processes. Also known as
biomechanics.
biophysics, dental,
n the branch of biophysics that deals with the biologic behavior of oral structures as influenced by dental restorations.

biophysics

the science dealing with the application of physical methods and theories to biological problems.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this way, intertextuality applies readily to our readings of the biophysical environment, regardless of the presence or absence of a discernible author.
Identification of the biophysical environment as a text, then, seems at first problematic.
Therefore, in our exploration of meaning-making for spaces and locations in the biophysical environment, we must apply the same principles utilized when examining meaning-making in more traditionally examined texts.
Intertextuality, Folkloristics, and the Biophysical Environment
I argue that these cues and perspectives--this "exhibition effect"--may be equally relevant outside of the museum walls, as one travels into the non-authored realm of the biophysical environment.
If we, as critics, are to agree that there is good reason not only to consider the environment as an intertext, but also to consider all texts as environments for thinking, then we readily may stress the importance of interrelations and coexistence between people, and between people and the biophysical environment.
For regions even further removed from the reaches of civilization and human creative forces, a paratext might be a book about biophysical environments in general, or existing photographs of the area.
Rugged topography, weak geological structure, extreme cold climate and other strange biophysical environments all act together and shape it as the barren lands along with some open and degraded grass lands.
In the same way that social and biophysical environments were identified as overlapping within the field of environmental health, we now reach a point in our discussion where the societal stewardship of ecosystems becomes relevant.