chronobiology

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chronobiology

 [kron″o-bi-ol´ah-je]
the scientific study of the effect of time on living systems and of biological rhythms. adj., adj chronobiolog´ic, chronobiolog´ical.

chron·o·bi·ol·o·gy

(kron'ō-bī-ol'ō-jē),
That aspect of biology concerned with the timing of biologic events, especially repetitive or cyclic phenomena in individual organisms.
[chrono- + G. bios, life, + logos, study]

chronobiology

/chron·o·bi·ol·o·gy/ (kron″o-bi-ol´ah-je) the scientific study of the effect of time on living systems and of biological rhythms.chronobiolog´icchronobiolog´ical

chronobiology

(krŏn′ō-bī-ŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The study of the effects of time and rhythmical phenomena on life processes.

chron′o·bi·o·log′ic (-ə-lŏj′ĭk), chron′o·bi·o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
chron′o·bi·o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
chron′o·bi·ol′o·gist n.

chronobiology

the study of the effects of time on living systems.
Pharmacology The formal study of the effects of circadian rhythms on the timing of illness and therapy
Physiology The formal study of circadian rhythms on physiologic and pathologic events

chronobiology

Pharmacology The formal study of the effects of circadian rhythms on the timing of illness, and therapy Physiology The formal study of circadian rhythms on physiologic and pathologic events. See Biorhythm, Chronotherapy, Circadian rhythm.

chron·o·bi·ol·o·gy

(kron'ō-bī-ol'ŏ-jē)
That aspect of biology concerned with the timing of biologic events, especially repetitive or cyclic phenomena.
[chrono- + G. bios, life, + logos, study]

chronobiology,

n the study of effects of time and cycles in biological systems.

chronobiology

the scientific study of the effect of time on living systems and of biological rhythms.
References in periodicals archive ?
Eastman and colleagues at Rush's Biological Rhythms Research Lab studied 44 healthy adults -- 24 men and 19 women -- between the ages of 19 and 45 years old.
The book begins with an introduction to early experiments noticing biological rhythms in a variety of organisms, followed by a chapter focusing on researcher Wilhelm Pfeffer and his seminal work at the turn of the twentieth century.
The sun exerts hegemony over biological rhythms of nearly every organism on Earth.
Scientists say light pollution affects the biological rhythms of both humans and animals and disrupts the migratory patterns of birds.
Chanel's research boffins have discovered that most women's skin has lost the notion of time - biological rhythms that used to be synchronised aren't - because the pace of modern life gives skin no rest.
According to him, our primeval biological rhythms influence our swarm mentality - and determine everything from when we might want a coffee to when we're likely to feel a bit grumpy.
SAD affects 62 million Americans, according to Michael Terman, director of the Center for Light Treatment and Biological Rhythms at Columbia University and a leader in the field.
The advent of electrical lighting permitted humans to stray from natural day-night cycles," which could potentially disrupt our biological rhythms, Bedrosian said.
As sleep drops and normal biological rhythms are disrupted, a person's body physically changes in ways that can help set the stage for diabetes, reports neuroscientist Orfeu Buxton of Boston's Brigham and Women's Hospital.
With this information provided through the retino-hypothalamic pathway, the SCN co-ordinates daily biological rhythms (ie.
Study leader Prof Tami Martino, from the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada, said: "Heart drugs are often given to patients in the morning for convenience without considering biological rhythms or time-related risks of adverse effects.

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