reductionism

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reductionism

[riduk′shəniz′əm]
an approach that tries to explain a form of behavior or an event in terms of a specific category of phenomena, such as biological, psychological, or cultural, negating the possibility of an interrelation of causal phenomena.

reductionism

an erroneous belief that complex situations may be explained by reducing them to their component parts and explaining these.

reductionism(rē·dukˑ·sh·niˑ·zm),

n a tenet of the modern bioscientific approach to knowledge according to which anything complex can be explained primarily in terms of its simpler components.

reductionism

policy of reducing subjects to its parts in an attempt to simplfy the understanding of the whole. The opposite of holism.
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His emphasis on positivism and biological reductionism is rather surprising; it may be that our different training (counselor education, marriage and family therapy vs.
Without a doubt, biological reductionism has considerable appeal.
It could have been destined to be the only challenger to the hegemony of biological reductionism in psychiatry.
However, that niche of social sensibility in a psychiatric world dominated by biological reductionism was disrupted by the resonances first of radicalised psychoanalysis in 'anti-psychiatry' and then of 'critical psychiatry' or 'post-psychiatry', under the dominant influence of Michel Foucault (Ingleby, 1980; Miller and Rose, 1986; Parker et al.
A more scientific approach to epidemiology gained influence after World War I, and while it supported environmental explanations of differential patterns of disease, it also imparted clinical authority to eugenicist and biological reductionism.
This is not to suggest that the biological reductionism inherent in psychopharmacology (i.
In light of this goal, he considers contemporary sociological discourse and its relationship to socialism and to Darwinism, the influence of biology on the social sciences, and the limitations of biological reductionism in sociology.

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