biocybernetics

(redirected from Biological cybernetics)
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bi·o·cy·ber·net·ics

(bī'ō-sī-ber-net'iks),
The science of communication and control within a living organism, particularly on a molecular basis.

biocybernetics

[-sī′bərnet′iks]
the science of communication and control within and among organisms and of the interaction between organisms and mechanical or electronic systems.

biocybernetics

(1) The science of biologic feedback-control mechanisms and communication in living organisms.
(2) The application of cybernetics to biological sciences—e.g., to cell biology, molecular biology, neurology and others.

bi·o·cy·ber·net·ics

(bī'ō-sī'bĕr-net'iks)
Thescience of communication and control within a living organism, particularly on a molecular basis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The research team from the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics have now, for the first time, observed and characterised the eye movements of freely moving rats.
In rats, on the other hand, the eyes generally move in opposite directions," explains Jason Kerr from the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics.
For the very first time, Nikos Logothetis, director of the Department for Physiology of Cognitive Processes at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics and his team used so-called neural event triggered functional magnetic resonance imaging (NET-fMRI) in both anesthetized and awake, behaving monkeys to characterize the brain areas that consistently increased or decreased their activity in relationship to a certain type of fast hippocampal oscillations known as ripples.
Gegenfurtner of the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics in Tubingen, Germany, suspected that the rod- and cone-based visual systems interpret motion differently.
Bernhard Schoelkopf, also a Member of HDC's Science Advisory Board and currently a department director at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics in Tubingen, Germany and co-author or co-editor of numerous books and published articles on pattern recognition and learning machines.
However, Henry Evrard, neuroanatomist at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics in Tubingen, Germany, has now discovered that the VEN also occurs in the insula of macaque monkeys.
A group of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics in Tubingen, Germany has now come closer to answering this question.
These cells create an auditory spatial map that helps the brain pinpoint sounds, says Hermann Wagner of the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics in Tubingen, Germany.
Bernhard Schoelkopf is currently a department director at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics in Tubingen, Germany and co-author or co-editor of numerous books and published articles on pattern recognition and learning machines.
The scientists Elvira Fischer and Andreas Bartels from the Werner Reichardt Centre for Integrative Neuroscience and the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics have investigated these areas with the help of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).
Bernhard Schoelkopf, a member of HDC's Scientific Advisory Board, is a department director at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics in Tubingen, Germany and co-author or co-editor of numerous books and articles on pattern recognition and learning machines.
Bulthoff, and Tobias Meilinger, who collaborated at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, in Tubingen, Germany, does not support these theories.