bioinformatics

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bi·o·in·for·ma·tics

(bī'ō-in'fōr-mat'iks),
A scientific discipline encompassing all aspects of biologic information acquisition, processing, storage, distribution, analysis, and interpretation that combines the tools and techniques of mathematics, computer science, and biology with the aim of understanding the biologic significance of a variety of data.

bioinformatics

(bī′ō-ĭn′fər-măt′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The use of computer science, mathematics, and information theory to organize and analyze complex biological data, especially genetic data. Also called biocomputing.
The computerised management, manipulation and analysis of large blocks of biomolecular data—especially DNA sequence data—using advanced computing, including electronic databases on genomes, protein sequences and 3-dimensional modeling of biomolecules and biologic systems

bioinformatics

Informatics The use of information technology to acquire, store, manage and analyze biological data. See Genomics, Informatics. Cf Chemoinformatics.

bi·o·in·for·mat·ics

(bī'ō-in'fōr-mat'iks)
A scientific discipline encompassing all aspectsof biologic information acquisition, processing, storage, distribution, analysis, and interpretation; it combines the tools and techniques of mathematics, computer science, and biology with the aim of understanding the biologic significance of a variety of data.

bioinformatics

The branch of information science concerned with large databases of biochemical or pharmaceutical information.

bioinformatics

the computer-based discipline that includes methods for storage, retrieval and analysis of biological data, such as RNA, DNA and PROTEIN sequences, structures and genetic interactions, by constructing electronic databases.

It is particularly relevant to GENOMICS, because of the need to manage the large amount of data generated by this research. Sometimes referred to as MOLECULAR BIOLOGY IN SILICO.

References in periodicals archive ?
The report's main focus is on identifying the challenges and opportunities that exist in the bioinformatic market following the adoption of high- throughput technologies and the generation of big data.
Food authenticity, traceability and product development will all benefit from improved bioinformatic methods for DNA and protein analysis.
We examine whether bioinformatic tools can help in analyzing the data collected.
As a result, bioinformatic studies are becoming increasingly dependent on advanced visualization software.
While the work scope is considered classified, the program will utilize many of the existent technology platforms at both companies, and in particular, will require comprehensive Next Gen Sequence and detailed bioinformatic work.
As part of its coverage, the report provides information on the following developments: -- Selected Diagnostic Tests That Incorporate Bioinformatics -- Selected Multiplexed Tissue-Based Cancer Tests -- Selected Histology Analyses Software Tools -- Selected Blood-Based Cancer Biomarker Tests That Use Software Analysis Tools -- Selected Chronic Diseases Tests With Integrated Bioinformatics -- Selected Innovations in Bioinformatic-Based Tests For Psychiatric Disorders -- Selected Systems For Bioinformatics-Based Infectious Disease Testing -- Selected Next Generation Sequencing Platforms
GeneProt integrates multidisciplinary, collaborative teams of leading experts in proteomics and bioinformatics with the vision, insight and ability to bring new efficiencies to the development and enhanced quality of tomorrow's human therapies.
The results will be analyzed by using several bioinformatic software methods.
The companies will collaborate on developing InforMax's GenoMax enterprise bioinformatic system into a enterprise scale data analysis system for the pharmaceutical industry for the analysis of genomic, pharmacogenomic, proteomic and drug screening information.
Bioinformatic tools will also be beneficial to microbial food analysis, offering advantages for rapid pathogen identification or the identification of beneficial microbial species, e.
CHAPTER 3 CONVERTING DATA INTO KNOWLEDGE 10 INTRODUCTION TO BIOINFORMATICS 10 FIGURE 1 BIOINFORMATIC RELATIONSHIP TO 'OMIC TECHNOLOGIES 10 BIOLOGICAL DATA SOURCES 11 BIOINFORMATICS IN TRANSLATIONAL MEDICINE: A SYSTEM BIOLOGY APPROACH 13 FIGURE 2 SYSTEMS BIOLOGY PRINCIPAL APPROACHES 13 BIOINFORMATICS IN DRUG DEVELOPMENT 14 MARKET DRIVERS 15 MARKET RESISTORS 16 CURRENT MARKET 17 MARKET BY REGION 17 TABLE 1 BIOINFORMATICS MARKET BY REGION, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 17 MARKET BY CATEGORY 18 TABLE 2 BIOINFORMATICS MARKET BY CATEGORY, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 19 MARKET BY APPLICATION 19 TABLE 3 BIOINFORMATICS MARKET BY APPLICATION, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 20
Immuno-Informatics: Bioinformatic Strategies for Better Understanding of Immune Function Novartis Foundation Hoboken, NJ:John Wiley & Sons, 2003.

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