microscopy

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microscopy

 [mi-kros´kah-pe]
examination with a microscope.
fluorescence microscopy conjugation of antibodies with fluorescent dyes in order to identify specific microorganisms or tissue constituents; see also fluorescence microscopy.

mi·cros·co·py

(mī-kros'kŏ-pē),
Investigation of minute objects by means of a microscope.
See also: microscope.

microscopy

/mi·cros·co·py/ (mi-kros´kah-pe) examination under or observation by means of the microscope.

microscopy

[mīkros′kəpē]
Etymology: Gk, mikros + skopein, to look
a technique for observing minute materials with a microscope. Kinds of microscopy include darkfield microscopy, electron microscopy, and fluorescent microscopy.

microscopy

The study of a structure using a microscope.

mi·cros·co·py

(mī-kros'kŏ-pē)
Investigation of minute objects by means of a microscope.
See also: microscope

microscopy (TSEM) (mī·krosˑ·k·pē),

n a technique that uses transmission scanning electron microscope to generate highly magnified clear three-dimensional images.

mi·cros·co·py

(mī-kros'kŏ-pē)
Investigation of minute objects with a microscope.

microscopy,

n a technique for observing microscopic materials using a microscope.
microscopy, digital epiluminescence
n computer-aided technique that employs a binocular surface microscope to examine pigmented skin lesions.
Microsporum
(mī´krōspor´əm),
n a genus of dermatophytes of the family Monilaceae.

microscopy

examination with a microscope.

confocal microscopy
a technique for obtaining high resolution images and 3-D reconstructions of biological specimens; a laser light beam is expanded to make optimal use of the optics in the objective lens and is turned into a scanning beam via an x-y deflection mechanism and is focused to a small spot by the objective lens onto a fluorescent specimen. The mixture of reflected light and emitted fluorescent light is captured by the same objective and after conversion into a static beam by the x-y scanner device is focused onto a photodetector (photomultiplier) via a dichroic mirror (beam splitter) to create the final image. Called also laser scanning microscopy; confocal scanning laser microscopy.
immunoelectron microscopy
the mixing of antibody with an antigen such as a virus on a specimen grid so as to increase the probability of visualizing a virus and to identify (type) the kind of virus present in the specimen, or antibody may be conjugated with gold and used to visualize and determine the location of specific antigenic determinants on a specimen.
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