bionics

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bionics

 [bi-on´iks]
scientific study of how functions, characteristics, and phenomena observed in the living world can be applied to nonliving systems.

bi·on·ics

(bī-on'iks),
1. The science of biologic functions and mechanisms as applied to electronic chemistry; such as computers, employing various aspects of physics, mathematics, and chemistry; for example, improving cybernetic engineering by reference to the organization of the vertebrate nervous system.
2. The science of applying the knowledge gained by studying the characteristics of living organisms to the formulation of nonorganic devices and techniques.
[bio- + electronics]

bionics

/bi·on·ics/ (bi-on´iks) scientific study of functions, characteristics, and phenomena observed in the living world, and the application of knowledge gained therefrom to nonliving systems.

bionics

(bī-ŏn′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
Application of biological principles to the study and design of engineering systems, especially electronic systems.

bionics

[bī·on′iks]
the science of applying electronic principles and devices, such as computers and solid-state miniaturized circuitry, to medical problems. An example of the application of bionics is the development of artificial pacemakers to correct abnormal heart rhythms. bionic, adj.

bionics

An evolving field that studies biological structure and function in order to create electronic and mechanical devices and synthetic body parts that would serve as viable substitutes for limbs, organs and tissues degenerated, destroyed or damaged by accidents or injuries of war.

bi·on·ics

(bī-on'iks)
1. The science of biologic functions and mechanisms as applied to electronic technology.
2. The science of applying the knowledge gained by studying the characteristics of living organisms to the formulation of nonorganic devices and techniques.
[bio- + electronics]

bionics

Biological principles applied to the design of engineering systems, especially electronic systems.

bionics

scientific study of functions, characteristics and phenomena observed in the living world, and application of knowledge gained to nonliving systems.