biogeochemistry

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bi·o·ge·o·chem·is·try

(bī'ō-jē'ō-kem'is-trē),
The study of the influence of living organisms and life processes on the chemical structure and history of the earth.

biogeochemistry

(bī′ō-jē′ō-kĕm′ĭ-strē)
n.
The study of the relationship between the geochemistry of a region and the animal and plant life in that region.

bi′o·ge′o·chem′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.

biogeochemistry

The scientific study of the chemical, physical, geological and biological interactions controlling the composition of the natural environment, especially as relates to the cycling of carbon, nitrogen, sulphur and phosphorus.
References in periodicals archive ?
On average, it's safe to say there have been 30 to 70 per cent losses of soil carbon under cultivation compared with the native, uncultivated conditions, says Jonathan Sanderman, a soil organic matter biogeochemist in CSIRO's Carbon and Nutrient Cycling Research group (Sustainable Agriculture Flagship).
The biogeochemist will wrap-up his findings from three previous expeditions at the meeting to try to pinpoint what is happening as the Earth's polar regions warm up.
We're not going to be able to track down each and every drop of oil," says biogeochemist David Valentine of the University of California, Santa Barbara.
University of Portsmouth marine biogeochemist, Dr Gary Fones says:
John has been a true pioneer in the discovery, isolation, and cultivation of marine cyanobacteria," said WHOI biogeochemist Mak Saito.
William Schlesinger, President and Biogeochemist, Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies
Because photosynthesis is complex, says biogeochemist Sean Crowe, who jointly led the study with Lasse Dossing of the University of Southern Denmark in Odense, scientists have thought "that it took a very long time to evolve.
Hyde lifestyle," said Mak Saito, a WHOI biogeochemist and lead author of the PNAS paper.
Chemical signatures of milk fat in perforated pots used as strainers provide the telltale clues to cheese making, says a team led by biogeochemist Richard Evershed of the University of Bristol in England.
Tracy Mincer, a biogeochemist at WHOI, zoomed in even further and found curious things happening on the surface of this plastic particle.
You tend to underestimate things when you do that kind of bottom-up approach," says Robert Howarth, a biogeochemist at Cornell University.
That's the puzzle Carl Lamborg, a biogeochemist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), is trying to solve.