Artificial Organ

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Any tissue, organ, limb, or highly complex biological structure that is partially or completely synthetic in nature, and performs the tasks of the structure it is intended to replace

artificial

made by art; not natural or pathological.

artificial abortion
see parturition induction.
artificial bone
see skeletal prosthesis.
artificial breeding
includes diagnosis of estrus, semen collection and handling, and artificial insemination (see below).
artificial breeding organization
a proprietary or cooperative organization dealing in the selection, purchase and maintenance of selected sires, mass collection, storage and sale of semen, employment of artificial inseminators, and often veterinarians skilled in the diseases of the reproductive tract, and the provision of artificial insemination services to individual cows and to herds, flocks or bands of animals. The responsibility is usually assumed for the keeping of complete records and the provision of these to clients and in the form of a periodic report. It is inherent in the animal industries that artificial breeding has as its objectives the genetic improvement and the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases of the species that it serves. Embryo transplantation and its attendant technologies could become part of an artificial breeding service.
artificial digestion for trichinosis
a sample of the meat to be examined is incubated with a mixture of pepsin and hydrochloric acid and the digesta examined under a microscope for specimens of Trichinella spiralis.
artificial drying
drying or dehydrating of feed by other than natural means of sun and air movement; usually by fossil fuel.
artificial kidney
a popular name for an extracorporeal hemodialyser.
artificial limb
a replacement for a natural limb. See also prosthesis.
artificial milk
see milk replacer.
artificial organ
a mechanical device that can substitute temporarily or permanently for a body organ. Not usually used in veterinary medicine.
artificial parturition induction
see parturition induction.
artificial rearing
the rearing of newborn animals by the use of milk replacer as an artificial diet, and often the provision of an artificial environment with a cloth-lined box and a heat lamp or other heating device. The provision of an appropriate amount of relevant antibodies or a prolonged course of antibiotics is an essential part of the program. The need may be a permanent one because of the death or complete agalactia of the dam, or because management insists on early weaning. It may be temporary if the dam is agalactic for a brief period because of illness.
artificial vagina
a device used in the collection of semen from male animals. The usual construction is of a rigid external tube lined by a flexible, thin rubber sleeve. Water at body temperature is introduced between the tube and the sleeve so as to achieve a spongy warm cavity which is lubricated with inert material. A rubber cone, terminating in a graduated plastic or glass collecting tube, is placed over the distal end of the device which is then ready to use.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cell encapsulation promises immunoisolation, which has initiated a flurry of research into bioartificial organs and tissue engineering, while the prospect of encapsulation increasing long-term in vivo cell survivability has opened new avenues for both targeted and recurrent therapeutic drug delivery systems.
The development of bioartificial organs has been facilitated primarily by the ability of cell encapsulation technology to isolate foreign cells from a host immune response.
While this integration of islets into the liver may limit both the maximal size of implantable islets and their development as discrete bioartificial organs, the concept of administering fibrosis-inhibiting drugs to endogenous cells surrounding an implanted capsule could represent a promising future direction of research.
Environments as diverse as the gastrointestinal tract, the peritoneal cavity, and the brain are all locations for either bioartificial organs, the controlled release of therapeutic drugs, or the perpetual production of substances to treat numerous endogenous deficiencies.
Doctors have found a new solution: by combining the unique properties of human cells with man-made materials, they have created bioartificial organs, including kidneys and livers, that could save thousands.
Cardiovascular Disease -- Artificial Heart -- Organ Donor Management -- Inflammation Issues -- Allorecognition -- Bioartificial Organs -- T Cell Activation -- Immunosuppression -- New technologies in Transplantation Immunology -- Pediatric Transplantation -- Renal Transplantation -- Infectious Diseases -- Liver Donoring -- Reproductive issues -- Xenotransplantation -- Emerging viruses in organ transplants -- Medical complications following transplantation
From gene therapy to bio engineering to bioartificial organs, the companies coming for this event are the voices of the future - they're pushing the limits of science and medicine to the edge, making the impossible possible through cutting edge research and innovation.
com) develops bioartificial organs, therapeutic cell systems and other products to treat life-threatening diseases of the metabolic organs - the liver, pancreas and kidney.
Solomon has over 25 years of technical and managerial expertise in membrane-based filtration devices and bioartificial organs.
3 /PRNewswire/ -- Circe Biomedical, the nation's most advanced developer of bioartificial organs, announced today that pivotal Phase III clinical evaluations of the HepatAssist(R) Liver Support System are being expanded with the addition of three new clinical trial centers.
develops and manufactures novel bioartificial organ systems.