binomial

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Related to Binomials: Monomials

binomial

 [bi-no´me-al]
composed of two terms, e.g., names of organisms formed by combination of genus and species names.

bi·no·mi·al

(bī-nō'mē-ăl),
A set of two terms or names; in the probabilistic or statistical sense it corresponds to a Bernoulli trial.
See also: binary combination.
[bi- + G. nomos, name]

binomial

/bi·no·mi·al/ (bi-no´me-al) composed of two terms, e.g., names of organisms formed by combination of genus and species names.

binomial

(bī-nō′mē-əl)
adj.
Consisting of or relating to two names or terms.
n.
Biology A taxonomic name in binomial nomenclature.

bi·no′mi·al·ly adv.

binomial

[bīnō′mē·əl]
1 containing two names or terms.
2 the unique, two-part scientific name used to identify a plant. The first name is the genus; the second, the species. A designation of the variety may also follow to further differentiate the plant. Use of the binomial is the only reliable way to accurately specify a particular herb, since common names differ from region to region and a single common name may often denote several herbs that differ widely from one another.

binomial

adjective Referring to an organism’s binomen—i.e., its genus and species names.

bi·no·mi·al

(bī-nō'mē-ăl)
A set of two terms or names; in the probabilistic or statistical sense it corresponds to a Bernoulli trial.
[bi- + G. nomos, name]

binomial (bī·nōˑ·mē·l),

n the taxonomic name for plants that always consists of two parts: the genus, which is the first name and is always capitalized, and the species, which is the second name and is always lower-case. These names should be used instead of common names to avoid confusion in the identification of herbs. Also called
botanical name, Latin name, or
scientific name.

binomial

composed of two terms, e.g. names of organisms formed by combination of genus and species names.

binomial distribution
categorization of a group into two mutually exclusive subgroups, e.g. sick and not sick.
binomial population
a population which can be divided into a binomial distribution.
References in periodicals archive ?
2010) An alphabetical list of Bromeliad Binomials, edn.
However, we predict that future work may reveal that the degree to which a factor affects a first-position preference in binomials is partially correlated with the degree to which it is over-represented in male names.
First, various phonological constraints condition the optimal ordering of binomial pairs, and findings from our corpus investigations show that male names contain those features which lend them to be preferred in first position, while female names contain features which lend them to be preferred in second position.
Since it is only the common names that are used repeatedly in a given text, abbreviating them (rather than the current official species names or their binomial counterparts if binomials were to become the official names) makes sense.
We also discuss recent proposals to introduce a nonlatinized binomial nomenclature for virus species.
is that the binomial is unstable when species are moved from one genus to another: Because the binomial is, in essence, the species name and must change when the tree changes, binomials are "unstable.
Although species names are not intended to convey phylogenetic information in any of the methods proposed here, names that consist of two parts may be misunderstood to imply relationship, when encountered by people who assume that they function like Linnaean binomials.
The probability density functions for the Bernoulli and binomial distributions are given in Appendix A.
Even though the Poisson distribution is usually not appropriate when multiple admissions are possible, it can be useful as an approximation to the binomial distribution when [m.
The scientific and infectious disease communities would benefit from the adoption of a standard pronunciation of Latin binomials that would obviate confusion and ambiguities.
The following lemma describes a recursion on these binomial coefficients that correspond to small changes in the arcs of the corresponding set partitions (in particular, it allows us to make arcs smaller).
Pelletier (1998) used a similar approach, with a negative binomial mean-variance assumption, which is a type of Poisson over-dispersion.