binocular disparity


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binocular disparity

The cue for depth perception which results from the difference in the position of images that each eye has of a given object; the closer the image, the greater the disparity, which creates the impression of depth.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of the distance cues listed by Cutting and Vishton (1995), height in the visual field, convergent linear perspective, relative size, and binocular disparity are the most likely candidates for explaining the observed discrepancies between VE and real-world judgments of distance.
In VEs, emulation of binocular disparity is achieved by presenting different images to the two eyes with some central area overlap.
Alternatively, it may involve major technological advances, such as inventing new techniques for emulating binocular disparity in VE displays.
Binocular depth cues, however, require the integration of information from both eyes and include convergence and binocular disparity.
The current paper deals with only the last of these cues for depth: binocular disparity.
This demonstrates that disparity information alone is sufficient to convey the perception of depth, a finding that is corroborated by the discovery of separate neural systems devoted to the processing of binocular disparity information (Barlow et al.
Advances in computer display technology are allowing for the relatively inexpensive addition of binocular disparity information to everyday applications.
The first goal was to determine whether the binocular disparity advantage that Regan and Beverley (1973a, 1973c) observed psychophysically would translate into a performance advantage once incorporated into a high-level task.
There was no accuracy benefit from the addition of binocular disparity information at the lowest levels of target number (Levels 1, 2 and 4), whereas at many of the higher levels, the addition of disparity information increased accuracy (Levels 3, 5, 6, and 7).
The current study clearly demonstrated that the addition of binocular disparity information (counterphase movement) can be beneficial to performance, especially at small levels of displacement (below 12[minutes]).
To reevaluate the current findings in terms of the goals set out for this research, it can be concluded that the psychophysical sensitivity advantage observed for binocular disparity stimuli over lateral motion can, under certain conditions, translate into a performance advantage for artificially looming stimuli.