sequence

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se·quence

(sē'kwens),
1. The succession, or following, of one thing, process, or event after another; in dysmorphology, a pattern of multiple anomalies derived from a single known or presumed prior anomaly or mechanical factor.
2. The imposition of a paricular order on a number of items.
Synonym(s): anomalad (2) , complex (8)
[L. sequor, to follow]

sequence

/se·quence/ (se´kwens)
1. a connected series of events or things.
2. in dysmorphology, a pattern of multiple anomalies derived from a single prior anomaly or mechanical factor.
3. in molecular biology, DNA having a particular nucleotide pattern or occurring in a particular region of the genome.

amniotic band sequence  early rupture of the amnion with formation of strands of amnion that may adhere to or compress parts of the fetus, resulting in a wide variety of deformities.
gene sequence  the ordered arrangement of nucleotides into codons along the stretch of DNA to be transcribed.
oligohydramnios sequence  a group of anomalies, usually fatal shortly after birth, caused by compression of the fetus secondary to oligohydramnios, which may result from renal agenesis or other urinary tract defects or from leakage of amniotic fluid; infants have characteristic flattened facies (Potter facies), skeletal abnormalities, and often hypoplasia of the lungs.

sequence

(sē′kwəns, -kwĕns′)
n.
1. A following of one thing after another; succession.
2. An order of succession; an arrangement.
3. Biochemistry The order of constituents in a polymer, especially the order of nucleotides in a nucleic acid or of the amino acids in a protein.
tr.v. se·quenced, se·quencing, se·quences
1. To organize or arrange in a sequence.
2. To determine the order of constituents in (a polymer, such as a nucleic acid or protein molecule).

sequence

[sē′kwəns]
Etymology: L, sequi, to follow
an order of arrangement of objects or events, as the sequence of peptides in a protein molecule.

sequence

Medspeak
The order of performing a task.

Molecular biology
noun A heteromeric chain of similar, but not identical molecules—e.g., nucleotides (in a gene) or amino acids (in a protein).

verb To determine the order of a sequence.

Paediatrics
(1) An array of multiple congenital anomalies resulting from an early single primary defect of morphogenesis which unleashes a cascade of secondary and tertiary defects.
(2) A group of clinicopathologic consequences of the aberrant formation of one or more early embryologic structures.

sequence

Pediatrics Anomalad An array of multiple congenital anomalies resulting from an early single 1º defect of morphogenesis that unleashes a 'cascade' of 2º and 3º defects; a sequence is also defined as a set of clinicopathologic consequences of the aberrant formation of one or more early embryologic structures. See Dysmorphology.
Sequence types  
Malformation Incorrect formation of tissues
Deformation Abnormal forces acting on normal tissues
Disruption Breakdown of normal tissue
Note: The Pierre-Robin sequence is caused by 1º mandibular hypoplasia, which results in a tongue that is too small for the oral cavity and which drops back–glossoptosis, blocking closure of the posterior palatal shelf, resulting in a high arched U-shaped cleft palate Examples of sequences include athyroidotic hypothyroidism sequence, DiGeorge sequence, early urethral obstruction sequence, bladder exstrophy sequence, cloacal extrophy sequence, holoprosencephaly sequence, jugular lymphatic obstruction sequence, Kartagener syndrome/sequence, Klippel-Feil sequence, laterality sequence, meningomyelocele, anencephaly, iniencephaly sequence, occult spinal dysraphism sequence, oligohydramnios sequence, Rokitansky sequence, septo-optic dysplasia–de Morsier sequence, sirenomelia sequence

se·quence

(sē'kwĕns)
The succession, or following, of one thing or event after another.
[L. sequor, to follow]

se·quence

(sē'kwĕns)
1. Succession, or following, of one thing, process, or event after another.
2. Imposition of a particular order on several items.
[L. sequor, to follow]

sequence,

n the order of occurrence or performance.
sequence planning,
n a method of identifying all the various dental treatments that a patient will need and putting those treatments in the most logical and effective order.

sequence

the order in which monomers occur in polymeric molecules; the order of amino acids in a polypeptide chain or of nucleotides in nucleic acid.

autonomously replicating sequence
usually plasmids that replicate independently of chromosomal DNA.
coding s's
sections of DNA which code for the amino acids of a protein.
consensus sequence
a sequence of nucleotides that is always present in a large set of independently determined sequences. See also box.
enhancer sequence
in DNA transcription, an upstream cis-acting DNA sequence that enhances expression of a particular gene and forms part of a complex array of upstream sequences that control gene expression.
expressed s's
in eukaryotic pre-messenger RNA the noncoding sequences, also called intervening sequences or introns, are removed in the nucleus; the mRNA is transported to the cytoplasm where the exons are translated to a protein.
intervening sequence
see intron.
palindromic sequence
signal sequence
a collection of hydrophobic amino acid residues at the amino terminus of secretory or integrated membrane proteins that direct the protein to cell membranes, particularly endoplasmic reticulum where the proteins are modified, e.g. glycosylated, and the signal sequence is removed prior to secretion or integration of the protein into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum.
temporal sequence
in protein synthesis, is from the amino to the carboxyl end.
References in periodicals archive ?
The description includes methods based on calculating the correlation coefficient between autocorrelation of a binary sequence received and a pattern sequence as well as methods used for filtering the presence of binary patterns.
This binary sequence is prone to correlation attack.
Essential to note is that the search of binary sequences with desired autocorrelation properties for N > 40 values by exhaustive method leads to an unacceptable increase in search time.
Sarkozy, On finite pseudorandom binary sequences I: measure of pseudorandomness, the Legendre symbol, Acta Arithmetica, 82 (1997), pp.
In this paper, we advance a new kind of binary sequences pairs sets-families of odd-periodic perfect complementary sequences pairs (OPCSPF), two kinds of methods for constructing OPCSPF are given, which can be used to construct OPCSPF from low level to high level.
This latter is a well known problem in radar and communication systems that use binary sequences [20].
In this paper, MGA is used for the design of Binary sequences which have good discriminating factors.
p | p : Z [right arrow] [summation over (term)]} for the set of all bi-infinite binary sequences.
Determining the Terminating Binary Sequence (TBS): TBS is defined as a binary set of numbers that includes only 0 or 1 numbers.
The as and bs of the binary sequence are merely tokens which could admit various interpretations.
That is, Conv is the set of binary sequences [sigma] such that the relative frequency of 1's in [sigma] converges to some limit x.
Pseudo-random binary sequence pattern generation: Allows engineers to test digital serial buses by streaming standard PRBS patterns - like PN7 and PN19 - without the need for a separate pulse generator.