bile pigment

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pigment

 [pig´ment]
1. any coloring matter of the body.
2. a stain or dyestuff.
3. a paintlike medicinal preparation applied to the skin. adj., adj pig´mentary.
bile pigment any of the coloring matters of the bile, derived from heme, including bilirubin, biliverdin, and several others.
blood pigment (hematogenous pigment) any of the pigments derived from hemoglobin, such as hematoidin, hematoporphyrin, hemofuscin, and methemoglobin.
lipid pigment any of various pigments having lipid characteristics, some of which also contain protein or iron, the most important one being lipofuscin.
respiratory p's substances, e.g., hemoglobin, myoglobin, or cytochromes, which take part in the oxidative processes of the animal body.
retinal p's the photopigments in retinal rods and cones that respond to certain colors of light and initiate the process of vision.

bile pigment

Any of the complex, highly colored waste products of the hemoglobin of old red blood cells, found in the bile. Included are bilirubin (orange), biliverdin (green), their derivatives (urobilinogen, urobilin, bilicyanin, and bilifuscin), and stercobilin, which gives brown color to intestinal contents and feces. Van den Bergh's test is used to detect the type of bilirubin in the blood serum.
Synonym: hepatogenous pigment
See also: pigment

bile

a clear yellow, orange or green fluid produced by the liver. It is concentrated and stored in the gallbladder, and is poured into the small intestine via the bile ducts when needed for digestion. Bile helps in alkalinizing the intestinal contents and plays a role in the digestion and absorption of fat; its chief constitutents are conjugated bile salts, cholesterol, phospholipid, bilirubin and electrolytes. See also bile duct, biliary.

bile acids
steroid acids derived from cholesterol; classified as primary, those synthesized in the liver, e.g. cholic and chenodeoxycholic acid, or secondary, those produced from primary bile acids by intestinal bacteria and returned to the liver by enterohepatic circulation, e.g. deoxycholic and lithocholic acid.
bile acid assay
are used in the diagnosis of liver disease and portacaval shunts when there are increased levels in the blood.
bile lake
bile duct obstruction may cause distention and rupture of biliary canaliculi. Small bile lakes result causing focal hepatic necrosis.
bile passages
bile canaliculi drain into bile ductules and interlobular ducts. These unite to form a series of hepatic ducts which carry the bile to the porta where they unite to form the common hepatic duct. This duct receives a cystic duct from the gallbladder (absent in the horse) and thence becomes the bile duct.
bile peritonitis
leakage of bile from the common bile duct or gallbladder may occur as a result of trauma, including perforation during percutaneous needle biopsy of the liver, and (rarely) erosion from biliary calculi. A chemical peritonitis results and may be fatal unless surgical repair is accomplished.
bile pigment
any one of the coloring matters of the bile; they are bilirubin, biliverdin, bilifuscin, biliprasin, choleprasin, bilihumin and bilicyanin. See also urobilinogen, stercobilin.
bile pleuritis
inflammation of the pleura resulting from perforating thoracic trauma with hepatodiaphragmatic fistula or iatrogenically from percutaneous liver biopsy techniques.
bile reflux
usually refers to movement of bile from the duodenum into the stomach where it may alter the gastric mucosal barrier causing gastritis and ulceration.
white bile
1. bile containing much mucin.
2. bile trapped in obstructed system for a long period and from which pigments have been resorbed.

pigment

1. any coloring matter of the body.
2. a stain or dyestuff.
3. a paintlike medicinal preparation applied to the skin.

abnutzen pigment
bile pigment
any one of the coloring matters of the bile, derived from heme, including bilirubin, biliverdin, etc.
blood pigment
any one of the pigments derived from hemoglobin, including heme, hematoidin, etc.
pigment cells
pigment-enhancing media
formulated to promote the production of pigment by some bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Rhodococcus equi, to aid in identification.
pigment genes
genes for each of the coat colors, e.g. white gene, black gene, orange gene.
respiratory p's
substances, e.g. hemoglobin, myoglobin or cytochromes, which take part in the oxidative processes of the animal body.