bilberry

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Related to Bilberries: whortleberry, Winberry

bilberry

/bil·ber·ry/ (bil´ber-e) the leaves and fruit of Vaccinium myrtillus, having astringent and antidiarrheal effects, used topically for inflammation, burns, and skin diseases, and orally for gout, arthritis, dermatitis, diabetes mellitus, and gastrointestinal, urinary tract, and kidney disorders.

bilberry

(bĭl′bĕr′ē)
n.
1.
a. A low-growing deciduous shrub (Vaccinium myrtillus) of the heath family native to Eurasia and western North America, having edible bluish-black berries borne singly or in pairs, used for making jams, jellies, and juice and for medicinal purposes.
b. Any of several similar plants of the genus Vaccinium.
2. The fruit of any of these plants.

bilberry

an herb found in the central, Northern, and Southeastern regions of Europe.
uses This herb is used for diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, glaucoma, cataract, capillary fragility, varicose veins, hemorrhoids, and mild diarrhea; possibly effective for some indications but controlled clinical trials do not support its use for improving vision.
contraindications Bilberry should not be used during pregnancy and lactation or in children until more research is available.

bilberry

Herbal medicine
A shrub, the berries of which contain anthocyanosides; bilberry is said to prevent atherosclerosis, and has been used internally for eye problems (cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration, myopia, night blindness, diabetes) and GI complaints (colic, constipation, diarrhoea, hypertension), and externally for burns, haemorrhoids, dermatitis, spider nevi and varicose veins.

bil·ber·ry

(bil'ber-ē)
Agent derived from dried fruit of Vaccinum myrtillus; studies suggest value in cardiovascular disease; also used to treat optic disorders; anecdotal reports claimuse improved vision.
Synonym(s): European blueberry, huckleberry, whortleberry.

bilberry (bilˑ·berˈ·ē),

n Latin name:
Vaccinium myrtillus; parts used: berries; uses: antioxidant, vasoprotection, glaucoma, cataracts, myopia, diabetic retinopathy, varicose veins, hemorrhoids, venous insufficiency, antidiabetic actions; enhances night vision; prevents macular degeneration; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children, those taking anticoagulant medications, antiplate-let medications, aspirin, insulin, NSAIDs, antidiabetic medications. Also called
bog bilberries, European blueberries, huckleberries, or
whortleberries.
References in periodicals archive ?
The beneficial health effects of bilberries are thought to be explained by a component called polyphenols, especially anthocyanins, the levels of which are significantly higher in bilberries than in commercially cultivated blueberries.
But an afternoon out in late July or August, scouring the moors for bilberries offered a dilemma.
After watching a football match in a pub they moved on to Bilberries, where Meek also went after watching the same match at another pub.
Dried bilberries and powdered fruits are now sold in health food shops as it has been shown that bilberries are high in flavonoids, which help prevent heart disease, strokes, cancer, cataracts and break down bad cholesterol.
Two of the negative trials with low doses both used tablets formulated from Swedish bilberries.
But the bilberries are all over the place and I managed to browbeat the family into collecting some.
At present, raw materials of Chinese bilberries are imported and home-made.
The attack at Bilberries nightclub in the town centre last November left 21-year-old Thomas Wragg badly cut, with teeth broken and a fractured facial bone.
In rats, anthocyanins from bilberries and chokeberries reduced the signs of colon tumors by 70% and 60%, respectively.
Over four months the cows ate choice vegetation such as grasses, the tips of bilberries and birch seedlings and branches.
Plants used in the tests included grapes, radishes, purple corn, chokeberries, bilberries, purple carrots and elderberries.
These delicious deep blue berries, which can be added to summer pudding and other red fruit desserts, are related to the wild, moorland bilberries, but form bushes rather than low, straggly plants.