Big Tobacco


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Big Tobacco

A popular term referring to the largest US tobacco corporations, most specifically, the Big Three: Philip Morris (Altria), Reynolds American (RJR) and Lorillard.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet the Food and Drug Administration recently released a rule that will remove vapor products from store shelves while allowing Big Tobacco companies to continue selling cigarettes known to cause cancer, illness, disease and death.
But now, even Big Tobacco has been forced to state the facts publicly.
Governments and health organizations like ours are at war with the tobacco industry, and we will continue fighting until we beat Big Tobacco.
I would go much further back than that despite frequently hearing in the 1950s and 60s the big tobacco companies stating that there was no scientific evidence that smoking causes ill health.
I would go much further back than that, despite frequently hearing in the 1950s and 1960s, the big tobacco companies stating that there was no scientific evidence that smoking causes ill health.
Summary: Big Tobacco, in its relentless pursuit of profit, is subverting, blocking, and weakening public health protections in any way it can
Now that richer countries are cracking down on tobacco advertising and promotion, big tobacco companies are spending billions into putting their products in developing countries which can ill afford this added burden.
Labor fought to establish these laws in the face of extremely well-funded resistance from Big Tobacco which continues to this day, with them only ever been given lukewarm acceptance by the coalition.
This is just the Big Tobacco playbook all over again 6 attempting to remove a psychoactive substance from any FDA oversight so a handful of wealthy investors can get even wealthier.
However, there is one section of the corporate world I am happy to demonise - Big Tobacco.
In 1998, 46 states sued Big Tobacco companies, alleging the companies had engaged in a range of fraudulent practices, such as knowingly misrepresenting the safety of cigarettes and targeting minors in their advertising, and violated state conspiracy laws.
But, to protect its own interests, Big Tobacco deliberately misled the public, doing everything possible to cast doubt on scientific findings that it knew to be accurate.