hydralazine

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hydralazine

 [hi-dral´ah-zēn]
an antihypertensive agent and vasodilator, administered orally, intramuscularly, or intravenously as the hydrochloride salt in treatment of peripheral vascular disease, essential and early malignant hypertension, thrombophlebitis, and other conditions in which dilation of blood vessels of the extremities is desired. Dosage is adjusted to the individual patient's response. blood pressure should be checked frequently, especially during parenteral administration. Side effects are rare with therapeutic doses, but the drug must be administered with caution to patients with coronary artery disease, advanced kidney damage, and existing or incipient stroke syndrome.

hydralazine

/hy·dral·a·zine/ (hi-dral´ah-zēn) a peripheral vasodilator used in the form of the hydrochloride salt as an antihypertensive.

hydralazine

(hī-drăl′ə-zēn′)
n.
An antihypertensive drug, C8H8N4.

hydralazine

Therapeutics A vasodilator which, with isosorbide dinitrate, is a 2nd line therapy in Pts with CHF for whom ACE inhibitors are contraindicated. See Congestive heart failure.

hydralazine

A drug that causes arteries to widen (vasodilatation) and can be used as an adjunct to the treatment of high blood pressure (HYPERTENSION) and moderate degrees of HEART FAILURE. It is seldom used alone. The drug is on the WHO official list. A brand name is Apresoline.

hydralazine

an antihypertensive and vasodilator drug that relaxes arteriolar smooth muscle by direct action. It is used as the hydrochloride in peripheral vascular disease, thrombophlebitis and congestive heart failure.
References in periodicals archive ?
The process of epistemic trafficking that was carried out by the FDA when it approved BiDil for use by African-Americans only effectively reified the concept of race as biology.
While the A-HeFT clinical trial appeared to be a success--indeed, it led to the 2005 FDA approval of BiDil as a drug for a specific racially defined population (10)--many commentators felt there were serious weaknesses with the research.
In A-HeFT, self-identified black patients taking BiDil in addition to current standard heart failure therapies (n=518) experienced a significant 43 percent decrease in the risk of mortality (P=.
BiDil shows that, ironically, arguments about the essential nature of race just may be the wedge issue the colorblind movement needs to change the consensus on racial health disparities.
Following the approval to market BiDil, NitroMed was strongly criticized for its pricing system for the drug.
Cautious voices also warn that the wrong precedent by FDA in its handling of BiDil could contribute to, rather than reduce, health disparities between blacks and whites.
By seeking approval of BiDil as a drug solely to treat African Americans, NitroMed, the corporate sponsor of the trials and owner of the rights to BiDil, has opened a Pandora's box of racial politics without fully appreciating the implications of what it is doing.
The substantial period-over-period decreases in total operating expenses are primarily the result of NitroMed's implementation of a restructuring plan in January 2008, which included substantial reductions in employee headcount and the discontinuation of promotional activities for BiDil.
For example, notwithstanding the controversy surrounding the research behind BiDil and concerns about deterministic representations of race, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) embraced the drug as a way to lessen health disparities for disadvantaged groups.
Ofili expressed particular concern about the daily obstacles that physicians face from drug benefit plans who continue to erroneously advocate for unproven therapies as substitutes for BiDil.
involved 1,050 African American heart failure patients randomized in a double-blind fashion to BiDil titrated to a target dose of 120 mg/day of isosorbide dinitrate plus 225 mg/day of hydralazine or to placebo, along with state-of-the-art medical management.
Although the original clinical trial for BiDil (fixed-dose isosorbide dinitrate and hydralazine) appeared to show that only African Americans clearly benefited from the drug, "it was a relatively modest-sized study, and there could very well have been some benefit in others," Dr.