ligand

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Related to Bidentate ligand: tridentate ligand

ligand

 [li´gand, lig´and]
an organic molecule that donates the necessary electrons to form coordinate covalent bonds with metallic ions. Also, an ion or molecule that reacts to form a complex with another molecule.

lig·and

(lig'and, lī'gand),
1. Any individual atom, group, or molecule attached to a central metal ion by multiple coordinate bonds, for example, the porphyrin portion of heme, the corrin nucleus of the B12 vitamins.
2. An organic molecule attached to a tracer element, for example, a radioisotope.
3. A molecule that binds to a macromolecule, for example, a ligand binding to a receptor.
4. The analyte in competitive binding assays, such as radioimmunoassay.
5. An atom or group covalently attached to a specified carbon atom in an organic molecule.
[L. ligo, to bind]

ligand

/li·gand/ (li´gand) (lig´and) an organic molecule that donates the necessary electrons to form coordinate covalent bonds with metallic ions. Also, an ion or molecule that reacts to form a complex with another molecule.

ligand

(lī′gənd, lĭg′ənd)
n.
An ion, molecule, or molecular group that binds to another chemical entity to form a larger complex.

ligand

[lig′ənd, lī′gənd]
Etymology: L, ligare, to bind
1 a molecule, ion, or group bound to the central metal atom of a chemical compound, such as the oxygen molecule in oxyhemoglobin, which is bound to the central iron atom.
2 an organic molecule attached to a specific site on a cell surface or to a tracer element. The binding is reversible in a competitive binding assay. It may be the analyte or a cross-reactant. Examples include vitamin B12, a ligand with intrinsic factor as the binding protein, and various antigens, which are ligands with antibody-binding proteins.

li·gand

(lī'gand)
1. An organic molecule attached to a central metal ion by multiple coordinate bonds.
2. An organic molecule attached to a tracer element, e.g., a radioisotope.
3. A molecule that binds to a macromolecule, e.g., a ligand binding to a receptor.
4. The analyte in competitive binding assays, such as radioimmunoassay.
[L. ligo, to bind]

ligand

A MOLECULE or ION that binds to a central chemical entity by non-covalent bonds. A general term for any molecule that is recognized by a surface receptor.

ligand

a molecule able to bind to a specific ANTIBODY and used to distinguish closely similar types of antibody.

li·gand

(lī'gand)
1. Any individual atom, group, or molecule attached to a central metal ion by multiple coordinate bonds.
2. An organic molecule attached to a tracer element.
3. A molecule that binds to a macromolecule.
[L. ligo, to bind]

ligand

(līgənd),
n 1. a molecule, ion, or group bound to the central atom of a chemical compound, such as the oxygen molecule in hemoglobin, which is bound to the central iron atom.
2. an organic molecule attached to a specific site on a surface or to a tracer element.

ligand

an organic molecule that donates the necessary electrons to form coordinate covalent bonds with metallic ions. Also, an ion or part of a molecule that specifically binds to form a complex with another molecule.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mixed donor atoms ligands arte subdivided into Schiff bases; amino acids, peptides, and proteins; complexones; and bidentate ligands.