Betel quid


Also found in: Acronyms.

Betel quid

(bē'tel kwid),
A preparation of areca nut and perhaps various drugs and flavorings wrapped in a betel leaf, chewed for its intoxicant properties.
References in periodicals archive ?
In India, the most common forms of smokeless tobacco used are tobacco with lime (khaini), gutka and betel quid.
Betel quid is freshly prepared by the user or a vendor.
They discovered that compounds in the arcea nut can "alkylate" the genetic material DNA, causing changes that increase the risk of cancer, and they are present in betel quid in amounts high enough to do so.
Alert for an epidemic of oral cancer due to use of the betel quid substitutes gutkha and pan masala: a review of agents and causative mechanisms.
Another PAR analysis conducted in Taiwan found that alcohol consumption, betel quid chewing, and cigarette smoking accounted for 25 percent of all HCC cases.
HARM'S WAY While the carcinogenic effects of betel chewing seem clear, scientists are still working to figure out how various components in areca nuts and the typical betel quid induce damage.
Prognostic significance of EGFR and Her-2 in oral cavity cancer in betel quid prevalent area.
People from ethnic minorities are at particularly high risk, partly because of the popularity of chewing tobacco and betel quids - a mixture of tobacco, leaves and spices.
Since many of these workers are from Asia, where rates of oral cancer-causing tobacco and betel quid use are high, this presents an additional marketing opportunity for our product.
It was traditionally thought, however, that smoking is a male habit and betel quid chewing a female one.
There has been a change in chewing patterns from the traditional betel quid with the introduction of newer products such as panmasala, khaini (sun dried tobacco and slaked lime) and gutka (a generic name for a product that contains tobacco, areca nut and several other substances sold in powdered or granulated form in small sachets).
During preliminary studies in India among chewers of tobacco-containing betel quids, researchers at the British Columbia, Cancer Research Center in Vancouver have found various oral doses of vitamin A and beta carotene not only cause remission of precancerous areas called oral leukoplakias, but also prevent new lesions from forming.