Bernheim syndrome

Bern·heim syn·drome

(bern'hīm),
systemic congestion resembling the consequences of right heart failure (enlarged liver, distended neck veins, and edema) without pulmonary congestion in subjects with left ventricular enlargement from any cause; reduction in the size of the right ventricular cavity is found by contrast imaging or echocardiography or at postmortem due to encroachment by the hypertrophied or aneurysmal ventricular septum.

Bern·heim syn·drome

(bārn'hīm sin'drōm)
Systemic congestion resembling the consequences of right heart failure (enlarged liver, distended neck veins, and edema) without pulmonary congestion in subjects with left ventricular enlargement from any cause; reduction in the size of the right ventricular cavity is found by contrast imaging or echocardiography or at postmortem due to encroachment by the hypertrophied or aneurysmal ventricular septum.

Bernheim,

P., early 20th century French physician.
Bernheim syndrome - systemic congestion resembling consequences of right heart failure without pulmonary congestion in subjects with left ventricular enlargement from any cause.
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References in periodicals archive ?
During the next century, a number of articles appeared describing "the Bernheim syndrome.
The authors further argued "that the theoretic criteria for the pathologic diagnosis of the Bernheim syndrome have not been fulfilled by the majority of cases [reported].
Despite the convincing arguments against the concept of the Bernheim syndrome by Evans and White and by Selzer and colleagues, cases purported to represent this syndrome continued to be published during the next decades, including its mention in a recent prominent cardiologic text (23).