Berlin Patient

Berlin Patient

A popular term for Timothy Ray Brown, a man who was infected with HIV-1 in 1995 while attending school in Berlin. He responded well to anti-retroviral therapy until 2006, when he was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia. Despite an initial response to chemotherapy, he developed pneumonia and sepsis, for which a stem cell transplant was given using—instead of a matched donor—stem cells from a donor with the CCR5 mutation, which makes cells immune to HIV. Brown claims to be HIV free, which, if true, would make him the first person to have been cured of HIV.
References in periodicals archive ?
htm) replicate the CCR5 delta genetic mutation which benefited the Berlin patient, Timothy Brown while other projects are targeting medications to weaken the virus by (http://au.
As Holt writes, "It's surprising that following the Berlin patient, the first HIV person to be in remission, no single investigator was trying to duplicate [Jessen's] unique therapy in a clinical trial.
A handful of HIV-infected adults around the world have been described in medical literature as newly free of the disease, most famously Timothy Brown, also known as "the Berlin patient," who was given a bone marrow transplant for leukemia that wiped out his HIV as well.
Inspired by "the Berlin patient," Timothy Brown, who was cured of HIV by the use of blood stem cells from a person who was born with T-cells lacking CCR5, they hope to duplicate his result in a safe way for people with HIV.
Two men--both dubbed "the Berlin Patient # 1 & # 2"--who will be remembered as 'harbingers' in the discovery for a cure have changed the course of history, particularly with the publication of the Berlin patient # 2 case report (2009) with AML BMT(Bone Marrow Therapy) from a donor who carried a 32 base pair deletion in the CCR5 gene, has infused new hope in researchers for at least a 'functional cure'.
In 2007, Timothy Brown, known as the Berlin patient, received a bone marrow transplant after he was diagnosed with leukemia.
Their cases differed from that of the so-called Berlin patient, Timothy Ray Brown, who also achieved viral suppression following a bone marrow transplant.
The finding is reported to be very significant because it suggests that by giving the patients BM transplants while they were on anti-retroviral therapy, they may have been cured of the AIDS-causing virus and immediately raised comparisons to similarities with that of Timothy Ray Brown, also known as "the Berlin patient," whose HIV vanished after receiving a bone marrow transplant.
Second, the Berlin patient ceased anti-retroviral therapy after his transplant, while the Brigham patients have remained on anti-retroviral therapy.
Several photos document the struggle of 62 year old Berlin patient, Siegfried Streiter, who was dying from end-stage biventricular failure.
A man named Timothy Brown, also known as "the Berlin patient," (http://articles.