benefit tourist

(redirected from Benefit tourism)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

benefit tourist

A popular term for a non-British citizen (e.g., from the EU) who comes to the UK to live off social security and other entitlements, including child benefit, child tax credit, state pension credit, jobseeker’s allowance, and employment and support allowance. Because these benefits are only afforded to those who meet the UK’s “right-to-reside” test, the European Commission has threatened legal action against Britain saying its rules on welfare discriminate against foreigners.
References in periodicals archive ?
The group called on the two leaders, the sides and the UN to open the crossing point that will connect the town of Famagusta after 43 years, "contribute to the relations, reconciliation and trust between the two communities, and greatly benefit tourism activities".
2-billion railway connecting Nairobi and Mombasa should benefit tourism, AP quoted Mohammed Hersi, chairman of Kenya Coast Tourism Association, as saying.
ASTORE -- Special Advisor for Chief Minister Farooq Mir said Friday that CPEC was a life line project for Pakistan that would largely benefit tourism, construction, trade and communication sectors of Gilgit Baltistan.
It will directly benefit tourism development while unclogging traffic in the city.
A DWP spokesman told The Journal that the figures were evidence of the work "We are committed to ensuring the done to crackdown on socalled benefit tourism.
This directive calls for an exception to Dubai'sGCC exclusivity clause with American theme park operator, Six Flags, with a view to benefit tourism and entertainment in the wider GCC region.
Tax cuts that will benefit tourism operators including a cut to the company tax rate for small businesses to 27.
Community benefit tourism initiatives e a conceptual oxymoron?
READER Kevin Wilson of Leeds wants benefit tourism stopped by "making the countries from which EU migrants come responsible for paying their benefits".
THE Prime Minister yesterday welcomed a landmark ruling that appeared to spell the end of benefit tourism by unemployed European Union migrants.
The annual British Social Attitudes survey of 3,000 people found that 61percent wanted rules toughened in this way to deter so-called benefit tourism, the BBC reported.
Peg Breen, president of the New York Landmarks Conservancy, and Ronda Wist, vice president for Preservation at the Municipal Art Society of New York made the case for landmarking, pointing out that historic districts promote property values and benefit tourism.