Benedict's solution


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Related to Benedict's solution: Benedict's test

Benedict's solution

 [ben´ĕ-dikts]
a chemical solution used to determine the presence of glucose and other reducing substances in the urine.

Benedict's solution

(bĕn′ĭ-dĭkts)
n.
A solution of sodium citrate, sodium carbonate, and copper sulfate that changes from blue to yellow or red in the presence of reducing sugars, such as glucose. Also called Benedict's reagent.

Benedict's solution

Etymology: Stanley R. Benedict
a term referring to two reagents (a qualitative and a quantitative) used in the examination of urine specimens. Both solutions contain cupric sulfate dissolved in a solution of sodium sulfate and sodium citrate in two different concentrations. When the solution is heated, the color of the resulting mixture depends on the concentration of glucose in the urine. See also Benedict's qualitative test.

Benedict's solution, Benedict's reagent

a chemical solution used to determine the presence of glucose and other reducing substances in the urine.