Bence Jones protein

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Bence Jones protein

[bens]
Etymology: Henry Bence Jones, English physician, 1814-1873
a protein found almost exclusively in the urine of patients with multiple myeloma. The protein constitutes the light chain component of myeloma globulin; it coagulates at temperatures of 45° to 55° C and redissolves completely or partially on boiling. See also multiple myeloma, protein.

Bence Jones protein

An abnormal 22–24-kD monoclonal of light-chain—usually kappa, less commonly, lambda—immunoglobulin derived from the clonal expansion(s) of plasma cells, which is found in the urine of 50–80% of patients with multiple myeloma and Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia. Bence-Jones protein is small enough to be excreted by the kidney.

Specimen
24-hour urine.
 
Comments
False-positive results can occur in connective tissue disease, renal insufficiency and in other malignancies. Immunofixation electrophoresis—or more recently, serum-free light-chain assay—is the preferred method for detecting BJPs. The heat detection method—Bence Jones reaction (see there)—has fallen into disuse.

Bence Jones protein

An abnormal dimer of light-chain Ig derived from the clonal expansion of plasma cells, found in the urine of 50-80% of Pts with myeloma and Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia; these proteins are small enough to be excreted by the kidney

Bence Jones protein

A MONOCLONAL immunoglobulin formed in excess by B lymphocytes and found in the serum and urine in cases of MYELOMATOSIS. (Henry Bence Jones, 1818–1873, English physician).

Bence Jones protein

Small protein, composed of a light chain of immunoglobulin, made by plasma cells.

Bence Jones protein,

n.pr protein commonly found in patients suffering from multiple myeloma.

Bence Jones protein,

Bence Jones protein

immunoglobulin light chain dimers found in the serum and urine of patients and animals with gammopathies, usually myelomas.
References in periodicals archive ?
Turbidimetric measurement of Bence-Jones proteins using antibodies against free light chains of immunoglobulins.
Urine protein electrophoresis revealed a monoclonal band in the light chain region consistent with Bence-Jones proteins.
Bence-Jones proteins and light chains of immunoglobulins (first of two parts).
Urine protein electrophoresis was negative for Bence-Jones proteins.
7) Thus, we hypothesized that Bence-Jones protein (BJP) quantitation by this technique is often misleading and that, instead, one may be able to use random urine protein/creatinine ratios to provide better information.
Further investigations--including Bence-Jones protein urinalysis, skeletal survey, bone marrow aspiration, and trephine biopsy, as well as spinal MRI--revealed no evidence of myeloma.