belief

(redirected from Beliefs)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

belief

 [bĕ-lēf´]
trust placed in a person or thing.
cultural b's shared statements that individuals in a cultural group hold as true. Cultural beliefs, which sometimes are expressed as proverbs, shape the values of a culture; these beliefs and values in turn affect that culture's practices. Cultural beliefs about health and illness influence health behavior and the significance of symptoms for an individual; for example, some people believe that cancer is sent by God while other people believe cancer is in part due to personal behavior and lifestyle.
References in classic literature ?
I hold the belief that all love that is true is foreordained and consecrated in heaven.
 There is one insuperable obstacle to a belief in ghosts.
And she was all of good as well as all of beauty, devout in her belief in her mother's worship, which was the worship introduced by Ebenezer Naismith, the Baptist missionary.
Our predecessors on this earth thought, perhaps not without reason, that the priest, who prescribed what men should think, ought to be paramount; so the priest was king, pontiff, and judge in one, for in those days belief and faith were everything.
Perambulating refutations are ye, of belief itself, and a dislocation of all thought.
It seems to me to be derivative, and to consist largely in BELIEFS: beliefs that what constitutes the thought is connected with various other elements which together make up the object.
What puzzled and distracted him above everything was that the majority of men of his age and circle had, like him, exchanged their old beliefs for the same new convictions, and yet saw nothing to lament in this, and were perfectly satisfied and serene.
Nothing that outrages the received beliefs can be right.
Others, again and those best able to appreciate the minister's peculiar sensibility, and the wonderful operation of his spirit upon the body -- whispered their belief, that the awful symbol was the effect of the ever-active tooth of remorse, gnawing from the inmost heart outwardly, and at last manifesting Heaven's dreadful judgment by the visible presence of the letter.
I can only repeat that I place implicit belief in her statement.
The sight of the empty hole made his heart leap violently, but the belief that his gold was gone could not come at once--only terror, and the eager effort to put an end to the terror.
Yet year after year we give eager belief to his promises.