behaviourism

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Related to Behaviourists: Behavioural psychology

behaviourism

(1) A school of psychology which holds that only overt (external) or observable behaviours can be reasonably analysed, and internal constructs (i.e., the mind, developmental stages, and psychoanalysis) are too subjective and intangible to be substantially examined. Modern behaviourism is exemplefied by BF Skinner’s school of operant conditioning.
(2) Behavioural intervention, see there.

be·hav·ior·ism

(bē-hāv'yŏr-izm)
A branch of psychology that formulates, through systematic observation and experimentation, the laws and principles that underlie the behavior of humans and animals; its major contributions have been made in the areas of conditioning andlearning.
Synonym(s): behavioral psychology, behaviourism.

behaviourism

an approach to psychology which studies and interprets behaviour by objective observation of that behaviour without regard to any subjective mental processes such as ideas, emotions and will. Instead, all behaviour is held to be governed by conditioned responses.
References in periodicals archive ?
To behaviourist trainers, the trainee's perceptions and motivation are not important.
The most popular behaviourist approach to training is 'direct instruction' (sometimes called 'explicit training' or 'trainer-led instruction').
In practice, many behaviourist trainers incorporate these principles in their training by following the six-phase model below.
Behaviourist models of training such as this can be very effective, particularly with practical skills.
Making best use of behaviourist training techniques
While much of behaviourist theory was derived from laboratory research withcanimals (rats and pigeons) as surrogates for human beings, in its paradigmatic concern with the controlling environmental influences on learning it remained, remarkably, rather distant from evolutionary thought.
It is also worth mentioning that the behaviourist model provides useful insights into understanding the ways in which learning is transferred within organisational settings (Rouiller & Goldstein, 1993).
It is thought that cognitivism emerged as a product and consequence of the limitations of behaviourist approach (Fiol & Lyles, 1985).
This factor on its own directly contrasts the behaviourist model, given that the latter strongly advocates that individual learners must perform actions and be reinforced in order for learning to occur (Ormond, 1999).