behavior modification

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Related to Behavioral modification: Behaviour Modification

behavior

 [be-hāv´yer]
the observable responses, actions, or activities of someone. adj., adj behav´ioral.
adaptive behavior behavior that fosters effective or successful individual interaction with the environment.
contingent behavior actions that are dependent upon a specific stimulus.
behavior disorder a general concept referring to any type of behavioral abnormality that is functional in origin.
disorganized infant behavior a nursing diagnosis defined as alteration in integration and modulation of the physiological and behavioral systems of functioning (autonomic, motor, state-organizational, self-regulatory, and attentional-interactional systems) in an infant.
health seeking b's see health seeking behaviors.
behavior modification
1. an approach to correction of undesirable conduct that focuses on changing observable actions. Modification of the behavior is accomplished through systematic manipulation of the environmental and behavioral variables related to the specific behavior to be changed. The principles and techniques of this method have been used in treatment of both physical and mental disorders, such as alcoholism, smoking, obesity, and stress. See also conditioning.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as promotion of a behavior change.
behavior modification (omaha) on the second level of the intervention scheme of the omaha system, a target definition defined as activities designed to promote a change of habits.
behavior modification: social skills in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as assisting the patient to develop or improve interpersonal social skills.
readiness for enhanced organized infant behavior a nursing diagnosis defined as a pattern of modulation of the physiologic and behavioral systems of functioning (autonomic, motor, state-organizational, self-regulatory, and attentional-interactional systems) in an infant, which is satisfactory but can be improved, resulting in higher levels of integration in response to environmental stimuli.
risk for disorganized infant behavior a nursing diagnosis defined as the risk for alteration in integration and modulation of the physiological and behavioral systems of functioning in an infant; see also disorganized infant behavior.
behavior therapy a therapeutic approach in which the focus is on the patient's observable behavior, rather than on conflicts and unconscious processes presumed to underlie his maladaptive behavior. This is accomplished through systematic manipulation of the environmental and behavioral variables related to the specific behavior to be modified; operant conditioning, systematic desensitization, token economy, aversive control, flooding, and implosion are examples of techniques that may be used in behavior therapy. Studies of classical and operant conditioning form the basis of behavior therapy, which has been used in treatment of both physical and mental disorders, such as alcoholism, smoking, obesity, and stress. See also behavior modification.

be·hav·ior ther·a·py

a therapy based on the concept that physical rather than mental events control overt behavior; such behavior is analyzed and selected behavior is then modified using specific techniques focusing on stimuli, conditioning, and learning, so as to improve health and functioning. See: systematic desensitization, conditioning, learning.
See also: cognitive therapy. Compare: psychotherapy.

behavior modification

n.
1. The application of learning techniques such as conditioning, biofeedback, reinforcement, or aversion therapy in order to change a person's behavior.

behavior modifier n.

behavior modification1


behavior modification2

a nursing intervention from the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) defined as promotion of a behavior change. See also Nursing Interventions Classification.

be·hav·ior mod·i·fi·ca·tion

(bē-hāv'yŏr mod'i-fi-kā'shŭn)
1. A systematic treatment technique that attempts to change a person's habitual maladaptive response by creating rewards for a new, desired response or unrewarding outcomes for the habitual response; intended to teach certain skills or to extinguish undesirable behaviors, attitudes, or phobias.
2. A psychological theory based on observation of behavior and operant principles of behavior change.

Behavior modification

A form of therapy that uses rewards to reinforce desired behavior. An example would be to give a child a piece of chocolate for grooming themselves appropriately.
Mentioned in: Bed-Wetting, Mutism

be·hav·ior mod·i·fi·ca·tion

(bē-hāv'yŏr mod'i-fi-kā'shŭn)
1. A systematic treatment technique that attempts to change a person's habitual maladaptive response by creating rewards for a new desired response or unrewarding outcomes for the habitual response; intended to teach certain skills or to extinguish undesirable behaviors, attitudes, or phobias.
2. A psychological theory based on observation of behavior and operant principles of behavior change.

behavior

the activity or pattern of activity of the patient; can be modified by training and medication; used clinically as a measure of cerebral activity.

abnormal behavior
includes any activity judged to be outside the normal behavior pattern for animals of that particular class and age, including the vices, the fixed patterns of abnormality.
aggressive behavior
is common in animals as part of the establishment of territorial rights by males, as competition for sexual favors, because of fear of the unknown, and as maternal protection of young. In companion animals, aggression and dominance directed against humans can also be learned. See also aggression.
allelomimetic behavior
group activity behavior; those behavioral traits used to interact with others, particularly developed during the early socialization period.
auditory behavior
the use of the voice to communicate is poorly developed in animals but is used for example in the various voices used by cattle including mooing, lowing, bellowing. Is used most extensively by animals in communicating between mother and young and in courtship.
automatistic behavior
see stereotypic behavior (below).
communicative behavior
the behavioral patterns that result in communication between animals. Includes auditory, visual and chemical patterns.
consumptive behavior
includes inappropriate sucking and wool sucking, particularly in cats. May be the result of early weaning.
destructive behavior
involves digging or the destruction of items, such as furniture, doors, or toys, by chewing. Causes include separation anxiety, fear-induced aggression and play aggression.
elimination behavior
the ritual and method of passing urine and feces, particularly as seen in dogs and cats. This includes searching for the site, pre-elimination behavior of sniffing, scratching, etc., posture and post-elimination action such as scratching the ground or covering feces with dirt. Housetraining involves modification of this behavior.
epimeletic behavior
maternal behavior; that demonstrated by a dam caring for her young in the early stages.
et-epimeletic behavior
care-seeking behavior; young responding to the dam's care giving. In puppies, this includes tail-wagging, licking the dam's face, and following the dam closely.
hallucinatory behavior
behavior which suggests dementia. This may be inherent or acquired, e.g. shying at nonexistent objects in cows with nervous acetonemia, biting at imaginary flies by dogs.
ingestive behavior
includes overeating, inadequate intake of food, predation, wool sucking, pica, coprophagia, garbage eating and food-related aggression.
behavior modification
the use of learning techniques to alter behavior.
predatory behavior
chasing and killing is commonly displayed by cats in catching birds and rodents. Dogs, particularly in packs, may show predatory behavior in threatening and killing of livestock and, in some instances, humans.
sexual behavior
includes courtship and the mating act. Much of the behavior is visual including posture, feather fluffing, tail carriage; some of it is auditory, especially in cats, but chemical communication via pheromones is the clincher.
social behavior
behavior relative to others in the group. Includes establishment of the peck order, bulling by steers in feedlots, crowd pressure in the feeding of large groups of pigs, cannibalism in overcrowded communities, even self-immolation in lemming communities. The social stress that may follow abnormal group behavior may result in lowered production, reduction in disease resistance, or the expression of actual disease, e.g. esophagogastric ulcer of pigs.
stereotypic behavior
constant and repetitive actions, such as vocalization, grooming, walking or weaving, which would otherwise be seen normally in the species. See also obsessive-compulsive behavior.
thermoregulatory behavior
actions such as seeking cool places, lapping water, huddling are self-explanatory examples.
visual behavior
body language for animals. Posture, gait, other body movements all convey information about the animal.

Patient discussion about behavior modification

Q. What is cognitive behavioral therapy for treatment of depression? What is it all about? Please explain? Could someone who has actually had this explain what it is all about. I don't want to get a copy and paste answer from a web page somewhere, just a simple explanation in plain simple terms that I could relate to.

A. You mention "for example thoughts of worthlessness"

Could anyone identify other examples of these types of thoughts?

I struggle the most with guilt and shame.

Others:
What others think of me being a recovering alcoholic, someone who has depression, having a son who has been in a penitentiary several times.
---

What can anyone really do about these thoughts anyway. I have not come up with anything that works except to offer them all back up to God and let them all go.

What else could a professional come up that is any better than that? I would really like to know. Otherwise, what good would it really do?

More discussions about behavior modification
References in periodicals archive ?
I said I wasn't going to enroll him in behavioral modification classes - there is no such thing as retraining a 9-year-old dog," Mr.
CSP had been successful in managing its population with a stratified incentive behavioral modification program of only three levels.
While preventing weight gain is the first step in treating the epidemic, we also must treat existing cases of obesity with all the tools we have available - nutrition, physical activity, behavioral modification, medications and surgery.
Researchers also need to examine treatments that combine stimulants and behavioral modification, it concludes.
All can be treated with behavioral modification techniques such as desensitization and counter-conditioning.
Effective behavioral modification is a continuous and time-consuming process, but it's a precious investment.
The initiative will provide Cigna health coaches with accurate individual activity data for analysis and behavioral modification recommendations, while also giving study participants insights they can use to potentially avert or control diabetes.
com)-- Addiction treatment facility StepHouse Recovery has recently announced the rollout of its behavioral modification program, which aims to help individuals struggling with disruptive attitudes and behaviors within their home, school and workplace environments.
For that they'll need to develop less-obtrusive monitoring and behavioral modification technology, and the software to run it.
The suspension of her medical license could be lifted if she successfully completes a program of behavioral modification and treatment, according to the order.
I find it helpful when working on a behavioral modification program with a resident to remember what happens when we push the button for an elevator and it doesn't show up.
Weight loss programs that make aggressive use of behavioral modification therapy, diet, and drug therapy significantly improve patient outcomes at 1 year, compared with single- or even dual-modality approaches, Dr.

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