Beer-Lambert law

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Beer-Lam·bert law

(bēr lam'bert),
the absorbance of light is directly proportional to the thickness of the media through which the light is being transmitted multiplied by the concentration of absorbing chromophore; that is, A = εbc where A is the absorbance, ε is the molar extinction coefficient, b is the thickness of the solution, and c is the concentration.
[August Beer, Johann Heinrich Lambert]

Beer’s law

A law stating that the concentration of an analyte is directly proportional to the amount of light absorbed, or inversely proportional to the logarithm of the transmitted light.

Beer’s law
A = abc = log(100/%T) 2 - log %T

where: 
A = absorbance
a = absorptivity
b = light path of the solution in cm
c = concentration of the substance of interest
%T = per cent transmittance—the ratio of transmitted light to incident light

Beer,

August, German physicist, 1825-1863.
Beer-Lambert law - the absorbance of light is directly proportional to the thickness of the ligand through which the light is being transmitted multiplied by the concentration of absorbing chromophore.
Beer law - the intensity of a color or of a light ray is inversely proportional to the depth of liquid through which it is transmitted.

Lambert,

Johann Heinrich, German mathematician and physicist, 1728-1777.
Beer-Lambert law - see under Beer, August
Lambert cosine law - mathematical measure of the intensity of radiation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The experimental dependences of transmittance on the relative density of fog for LEDs of different colour were found to be exponential and corresponded to the Beer-Lambert-Bouguer law.
However, for the practical exercise presented in this article, it is not necessary to calculate the immersion factor for the recommended UV meter, as only relative measurements will need to be obtained and analysed in order to investigate the Beer-Lambert-Bouguer Law.
The following practical exercise aims to provide the Year 11 and Year 12 Physics students with a step by step appreciation into how the Beer-Lambert-Bouguer Law can be applied underwater and how handheld solar UV measurement instrumentation can be employed to provide rapid estimations for both [K.