beech

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beech

a forest tree of the genus Fagus with glossy oval leaves, thin, smooth, greyish bark and fine-grained wood.

beech

see fagus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Beeching said his brief was that "the industry must be of a size and pattern suited to modern conditions and prospects.
DR BEECHING -THE MAN ||Chairman of British Rail Dr Richard Beeching was also a physicist and engineer.
The Beatles considered Lord Beeching when they were trying to find someone would could sort out the business affairs of their company Apple Corps || The effect of the 'Beeching Axe' on a smal station was the subject of Oh, Doctor Beeching
Several ex-railway sites are named after Beeching including Beeching's Close, in the Leicestershire village of Countesthorpe, which was served by a rail line from Rugby.
A footnote to Beeching is that he produced a second report in 1965, Development of the Major Railway Trunk Routes, which suggested even more cuts to what he believed to still be a bloated network and, recommended that of the 7,500 miles of trunk railway only 3,000 miles should be invested in to be developed in the future.
This was too much for Harold Wilson who chose to dismiss the report and Beeching was effectively dismissed and went back to ICI to become eternally damned as the 'axe-man' of British railways.
Beeching was a man of his time who took the brunt of the outrage of those who believed that he had attacked a national institution.
However, as many critics of Beeching acknowledge, British railways in the 1960s undoubtedly needed reorganisation but in a way that more carefully considered what would be essential in the future.
Queen Elizabeth "was aware that if the Turks came in victorious, so that the Crescent prevailed against the Cross, then Europe as a recognizable society with its inherited moral values must change for the worse; the world Englishmen had always known would disappear," writes Beeching.
While the Venetians fought on out of doomed courage, "a mass of Christian galley slaves, having filed away at their fetters in readiness, broke free at a signal from the leaders of their conspiracy," recounts Beeching.