Bdellovibrio


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Bdellovibrio

 [del″o-vib´re-o]
a genus of small, gram-negative, rod-shaped or curved, actively motile bacteria that are obligate parasites of certain other gram-negative bacteria, including Pseudomonas, Salmonella, and coliform bacteria.

bdellovibrio

 [del″o-vib´re-o]
any microorganism of the genus Bdellovibrio.

Bdel·lo·vib·ri·o

(del'ō-vib'rē-ō),
Genus of aerobic, motile, gram-negative bacteria, obligately parasitic on other gram-negative bacteria; occurring in soil and water around the world.

Bdellovibrio

/Bdel·lo·vib·rio/ (del″o-vib´re-o) a genus of small, rod-shaped or curved, actively motile bacteria that are obligate parasites on certain gram-negative bacteria, including Pseudomonas, Salmonella, and coliform bacteria.

bdellovibrio

/bdel·lo·vib·rio/ (del″o-vib´re-o) any microorganism of the genus Bdellovibrio.

Bdellovibrio

(dĕl″ō-vĭb′-rē-ō″) [Gr. bdello, leech, + vibrio]
A genus of gram-negative bacteria that parasitize other bacteria by living and reproducing inside them.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a small, curved Gram negative predatory bacteria discovered by chance in 1962 by Stolp and Petzold while they were trying to isolate bacteriophages for plant pathogenic bacteria from soil.
The predatory life cycle of Bdellovibrio lasts around 34 hours and has several stages which are microscopically distinct.
The mechanism by which the Bdellovibrio differentiates between a gram negative, gram positive bacteria or inanimate particle is unknown.
bacteriovorus 109J with a mutation in one of over 20 predicted methyl--accepting chemotaxis protein genes of Bdellovibrio significantly reduced, but did not abolish, predatory efficiency in liquid cultures.
After Bdellovibrio collision with its prey it gets attaches to its prey reversibly for short duration and then gets anchored to its prey irreversibly using appendages located at the non flagellated pole.
After Bdellovibrio irreversibly attaches to the prey, it creates a pore in the host envelope for its entry in about 10 minutes.
The Bdellovibrio causes the cessation of metabolic activity within the host cell.
Once Bdellovibrio is inside the periplasm, it seals the membrane hole through which it gains its entry and the host cell is now called a bdelloplast.
The Bdellovibrio detect that the prey cytoplasm is exhausted, and several uniformly shaped mononucleate daughter cells of normal size are formed.
The predator produce hydrolytic enzymes that degrade the modified peptidoglycan layer from inside and multiple Bdellovibrio are released from the bdelloplast.
She continued "We think that Bdellovibrio could be particularly useful as a topical treatment for wounds or foot rots but we wanted to know what might happen if it is ingested - either deliberately as a treatment, or by accident.
Previous studies have shown that Bdellovibrio is very effective at invading and killing other bacterial cells in a test tube.