Baylisascaris procyonis

Bay·lis·as·ca·ris pro·cy·on·is

a large roundworm commonly found in raccoons; has been the cause of human visceral larva migrans and ocular larva migrans, following accidental ingestion of embryonated Baylisascaris procyonis eggs in feces of infected raccoons.
See also: visceral larva migrans.

Baylisascaris procyonis

An intestinal parasite of raccoons, the eggs of which may be ingested by humans and 50 other species of mammals, hatch in the intestines and migrate through organs and muscles.
 
Clinical findings
Skin irritation, respiratory distress, hepatomegaly and fever due to larval migration, nausea, lethargy, incoordination, blindness, encephalitis, blindness, death.
 
Prognosis
Poor, profound neurologic impairment, partial paralysis, cotical blindness, developmental delay, etc.

Management
Deworming; possibly albendazole.

Baylisascaris procyonis

Raccoon roundworm Parasitology An intestinal parasite of raccoons, the eggs of which may be ingested by humans, hatch in the intestine and migrate through organs and muscles Clinical Nausea, fatigue, hepatomegaly, loss of muscle coordination, blindness, encephalitis, death Management Possibly, albendazole Prognosis Poor, profound neurologic impairment, partial paralysis, cortical blindness, developmental delay, etc

Baylisascaris procyonis

(bal?i-sas'ka-ris pro?se-on'is, se'on-is) [L. procyon, raccoon fr. Gr.]
The raccoon roundworm. Accidental consumption of roundworm eggs (such as by children who put contaminated soil in their mouths) can result in encephalitis. Synonym: raccoon ascaris
References in periodicals archive ?
Baylisascaris procyonis roundworms are ubiquitous ascarid parasites of raccoons; prevalence of infection can reach 82% (3).
Raccoons were infected with the nematodes Arthrocephalus lotoris, Baylisascaris procyonis, and Capillaria plica, the trematode Fibricola cratera, and the tapeworm Atriotaenia procyonis.
Their large population sizes and ubiquitous distribution make raccoons an important vector for parasites and diseases including distemper, rabies, and the roundworm Baylisascaris procyonis (Mitchell et al.
Baylisascaris procyonis, or the raccoon roundworm, primarily utilizes the raccoon as its definitive host, and has been found in >90 species of North American animal intermediate hosts (mostly birds, lagomorphs, and rodents) (Kazacos 2001).
A slightly different test is used for diagnosing raccoon roundworm, called Baylisascaris procyonis.
The threat I was telling you about was in raccoon feces containing the eggs of Baylisascaris procyonis (a small intestine nematode parasite of raccoons).
Both species have been implicated in woodrat declines in the northeast United States from increased predation or exposure to Baylisascaris procyonis (Balcom 1994; Balcom & Yahner 1996; McGowan 1993).
To the Editor: Baylisascaris procyonis, an intestinal roundworm that infects raccoons (Procyon lotor), causes fatal or severe neural larva migrans in animals and humans (1,2).
Survey of Raccoons on Key Largo, Florida, USA, for Baylisascaris procyonis.
To the Editor: Baylisascaris procyonis is an ascarid roundworm that commonly parasitizes the intestine of North American raccoons (1,2).
To the Editor: Baylisascaris procyonis, a roundworm parasite of raccoons (Procyon lotor), increasingly is being documented as a cause of severe human disease (1).
Key words: Baylisascaris procyonis, canine distemper virus, disease, latrine, parasite, Procyon lotor, raccoon, southern Illinois