Bayes' theorem

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Related to Bayes's Theorem: conditional probability

Bayes' theorem

[bāz′]
Etymology: Thomas Bayes, British mathematician, 1702-1761
a mathematic statement of the relationships of test sensitivity, specificity, and the predictive value of a positive test result. The predictive value of the test is the number that is useful to the clinician. A positive result demonstrates the conditional probability of the presence of a disease.

theorem

(the'o-rem) [Gr. theorema, principle arrived at by speculation]
A proposition that can be proved by use of logic, or by argument, from information previously accepted as being valid.

Bayes' theorem

See: Bayes' theorem.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Research on Social Work Practice, Wolf-Branigin and Duke (2007) attempted to use Bayes's theorem to compute probabilities of involvement in spiritual activities and completing a Salvation Army substance abuse treatment program.
Bayes's theorem follows directly from the laws of probability and is not controversial.
This approach, which applies Bayes's Theorem to a four-category geocoding and surname analysis, appears to be a particularly useful means of integrating these sources of information and substantially outperforms a classification-based means of combining this information (CSG).
The posterior is obtained by application of Bayes's theorem, which states that the posterior is proportional to the product of the prior and the likelihood of the sample, [Pi](Y|[Theta]), viz.