Batista procedure


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Batista procedure

(bah-tēs'tă),
surgical reduction of one or both ventricles when they are excessively dilated.

Batista procedure

A radical procedure for treating some forms of end-stage heart failure—in particular congestive heart failure (CHF)—due to dilated cardiomyopathy, based on a radical application of the Frank-Starling law, in which a wedge of the left ventricular is excised, and the reduced ventricle then sewn together.

Batista procedure

Left ventricular diameter reduction, left ventriculectomy, ventricular reduction Cardiovascular surgery A radical surgical procedure for treating some forms of end-stage heart failure, in particular CHF due to dilated cardiomyopathy. Cf Cardiomyoplasty.

Batista procedure

See HEART REDUCTION.
References in periodicals archive ?
This approach was developed when surgeons in Leeds became dissatisfied with the morbidity and mortality associated with the Batista procedure, which involves resection of myocardium from the left ventricular free wall.
The Batista procedure, named for the Brazilian heart surgeon who developed it, involves slicing away a portion of the heart's enlarged left ventricle and reshaping the chamber to make it pump more efficiently.
Based on this and other studies, the Batista procedure appears to be a failure, wrote Mark Ratcliffe, MD of the University of California, San Francisco in an accompanying editorial.
The brief and misguided efforts of the Batista procedure raised interest in the surgical community about developing mechanical approaches to heart failure.
The Batista procedure, touted as a less costly and more available alternative to transplantation for persons in heart failure, has failed to live up to its hype, with many Batista patients now back on cardiac transplant waiting lists.
The Cleveland Clinic, which has treated more patients with the Batista procedure than any other US hospital, performed 57 of the operations between May 1996 and August 1997 but just four in the last year.