basal

(redirected from Basal plate)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

basal

 [ba´sal]
pertaining to or situated near a base; in physiology, pertaining to the lowest possible level.
basal body temperature method a type of natural family planning; see contraception.

ba·sal

(bā'săl), [TA]
1. Situated nearer the base of a pyramidal organ in relation to a specific reference point; opposite of apical. Synonym(s): basalis [TA]
2. In dentistry, denoting the floor of a cavity in the grinding surface of a tooth.
3. Denoting a standard or reference state of a function, as a basis for comparison. More specifically, denoting the exact conditions for measurement of basal metabolic rate (q.v.); basal conditions do not always denote a minimum value, for example, metabolic rate in sleep is usually lower than the basal rate but is inconvenient for standard measurement.

basal

/ba·sal/ (ba´s'l) pertaining to or situated near a base; in physiology, pertaining to the lowest possible level.

basal

[bā′səl]
Etymology: Gk, basis, foundation
pertaining to the fundamental or the basic, as basal anesthesia, which produces the first stage of unconsciousness, and the basal metabolic rate, which indicates the lowest metabolic rate; basal membrane.

basal

adjective Referring to a base, baseline or non plus minimum.

ba·sal

(bā'săl) [TA]
1. Situated nearer the base of a pyramidal organ in relation to a specific reference point; opposite of apical.
2. dentistry Denoting the floor of a cavity in the grinding surface of a tooth.
3. Denoting a standard or reference state of a function, as a basis for comparison.

basal

Pertaining to, situated at, or forming, an anatomical base of any kind.

basal 

1. In anatomy, denoting a layer or cells farthest away from the surface. Example: the basal cells of the corneal epithelium nearest Bowman's layer. 2. In optics, denoting the surface opposite to the apex of a prism.

ba·sal

(bā'săl) [TA]
1. [TA] In dentistry, denoting the floor of a cavity in the grinding surface of a tooth.
2. Situated nearer the base of a pyramidal organ in relation to a specific reference point.
Synonym(s): basalis [TA] .
3. Denoting a standard or reference state of a function, as a basis for comparison.

basal (baz´əl),

adj 1. describing the minimal functions necessary for life.
adj 2. located at or forming the base of a structure.
n 3. the fundamental structures from which an organism is derived.
basal bone,
n portion of the jawbones that forms the body of the maxilla or mandible.
basal lamina,
n a layer composed of the lamina densa and the lamina lucida. It is an extracellular matrix that lies beneath the epithelium and is believed to inhibit cell migration. The term is usually associated with electron microscopy, whereas the term
basement membrane is usually associated with light microscopy.
basal layer,
basal metabolic rate (BMR)
n a type of basal rate, or energy exchange, determined by means of a clinical test of oxygen consumption in a subject who has had a good night's rest, has fasted for 12 to 14 hours, and has been physically, mentally, and emotionally at rest for 30 minutes; usually indicated as a percentage of the normal calorie production per surface area, the normal values ranging between plus and minus 20%.
basal metabolism,
n See basal metabolic rate.
basal seat,
n the oral tissues and structures that support a denture.
basal seat area,
basal seat outline,
n an outline on the mucous membrane or on a cast of the entire area that is to be covered by a denture.
basal surface,

basal

pertaining to or situated near a base; in physiology, pertaining to the lowest possible level.

basal body
the structure that acts as a template for the characteristic 9 + 2 arrangement of the microtubules of eukaryotic cilia and flagella.
basal cell tumors
neoplasms of the multipotential cells within the stratum germinativum of the skin. They are common in dogs and cats, are locally expansive and do not metastasize.
basal energy requirements (BER)
see energy requirements.
basal ganglia
a collection of masses of gray matter at the base of the cerebral hemispheres, subthalamus and midbrain which are responsible for much of the organization of the activity of somatic muscles. The individual nuclei are the caudate nucleus, putamen, globus pallidus, endopeduncular nucleus, subthalamic nucleus and the substantia nigra. Other nuclei which have a similar function but are usually not included in the group are the amygdaloid nuclei and the red nucleus.
basal layer
see stratum basale.
basal membrane
the deepest layer of the epidermis in the avian skin. Called also dermoepidermal junction.
basal metabolic rate
see metabolic rate.
basal metabolism
the minimal energy expended for the maintenance of respiration, circulation, peristalsis, muscle tonus, body temperature, glandular activity and the other vegetative functions of the body. See also metabolic rate.
basal metabolism test
a method of measuring the body's expenditure of energy by recording its rate of oxygen intake and consumption. Once a major test of thyroid gland function, it is being replaced by diagnostic tests requiring less extensive preparation and capable of producing more accurate test results, e.g. the determination of the levels of thyroid hormones in the blood and the radioiodine uptake test.
basal nuclei
see basal ganglion.
basal plate
the ventral plate of the developing neural tube of the embryo; associated with motor output from the CNS.
basal tone
degree of contractile tension remaining in blood vessels after complete elimination of all external excitatory influences.
References in periodicals archive ?
lumpus are compound structures, formed of one to many denticles each with its own basal plate and depression in it.
There are no hollows or cavities corresponding to the spinules in the visceral sides of the basal plates of the tubercles in the fourhorn sculpin.
Tubercles of male and female specimens differ in the configuration of the basal plate and in the number and arrangement of spines.
The large lateral line segments of the longspined bullhead, placed anteriorly of the body, have a rim extending from the basal plate, a long anterior opening and pores arranged in rows.
In one species, Triglopsis quadricornis, tubercles are spinulose and two different types are developed, the crescent-shaped spinulose tubercles, which grew posterolaterally but not anteriorly, and the subcircular or quadrangular spinulose tubercles from the rows, which grew more or less centrifugally; both are completely covered with spinules on the common basal plate.
In the classification of Roberts (1993) they resemble the spinoid type rather than the ctenoid type because the spines develop not separately from, but as extensions from, and remain firmly attached to, the basal plate.
Knerialepis Hanke & Karatajute-Talimaa has the scales whose odontodes consist of mesodentine and the basal plate of aspidine.
The scales of Cladodontida also are formed of orthodentine and the basal plate of scales is either of cellular bone tissue (in Cladolepis) or acellular (in Ohiolepis and Protacrodus) (Gross 1973).
Based on the features of scale sculpture, the vascular canal network, and the placement of the canal openings beneath the odontodes in the basal plate, a new chondrichthyan of uncertain order and family, Karksilepis parva gen.