Bartonella

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Bartonella

 [bahr″to-nel´ah]
a genus of bacteria of the family Bartonellaceae, made up of gram-negative cells in chains; it includes B. bacillifor´mis, the etiologic agent of bartonellosis (carrión's disease), and B. hen´selae, the etiologic agent of cat-scratch disease.

Bartonella

(bar'tō-nel'ă),
A genus of bacteria found in humans and in arthropod vectors; grows slowly in artificial media and may be recovered from blood cultures from infected patients; may be seen intracellularly in tissues and erythrocytes. Bartonella is a minute, gram-negative, coccobacillary organism, which may appear curved; it can cause an indolent, poorly defined, progressive disease in immunocompromised patients, including those with HIV infections.
[A. L. Barton]

Bartonella

/Bar·to·nel·la/ (bahr″to-nel´ah) a genus of the family Bartonellaceae, including B. bacillifor´mis, the etiologic agent of Carrión's disease, and B. hen´selae, the agent of cat-scratch disease.

Bartonella

[bär′tənel′ə]
Etymology: Alberto Barton, Peruvian bacteriologist, 1871-1950
a genus of small gram-negative flagellated pleomorphic coccobacilli, some of which are opportunistic pathogens. Members of the genus infect red blood cells and the epithelial cells of the lymph nodes, liver, and spleen. They are transmitted at night by the bite of a sandfly of the genus Phlebotomus. Three species are considered important in human disease. B. bacilliformis causes bartonellosis. Because of its distinctive appearance, it is easily identified on microscopic examination of a smear of blood stained with Wright's stain. B. henselae is the causative agent of cat-scratch fever and bacillary angiomatosis. B. quintana causes trench fever and may cause peliosis of the liver.

Bar·to·nel·la

(bahr-tō-nel'ă)
A genus of bacteria closely resembling Rickettsia in staining properties, morphology, and mode of transmission between hosts. Organisms usually reside extracellularly in arthropod hosts and intracellularly in mammalian hosts.
[A. L. Barton]

Barton,

Alberto Leopaldo, Peruvian physician, 1871-1950.
Bartonella - bacterium transmitted by Andean sandflies, causing bartonellosis.
bartonellosis - infection with Bartonella bacilliformis causing acute febrile illness followed by benign skin eruptions.

Bar·to·nel·la

(bahr-tō-nel'ă)
A genus of bacteria found in humans and in arthropod vectors; grows slowly in artificial media and may be recovered from blood cultures from infected patients; a minute, gram-negative, coccobacillary organism; can cause an indolent, poorly defined, progressive disease in immunocompromised patients, including those with HIV infections.
[A. L. Barton]

Bartonella

a genus of gram-negative, coccoid or rod-shaped bacteria in the family Bartonellaceae. B. bacilliformis is the cause of Oroya fever or Carrión's disease in humans and occasionally dogs, in South America.

Bartonella henselae
causes cat-scratch disease, bacillary angiomatosis, and endocarditis in humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
10) Vector biologists and others with extensive arthropod exposures are at increased risk for acquiring Bartonella infections.
Similar to lesions that develop with Coxiella burnetii endocarditis (7), valvular vegetative lesions can result from chronic Bartonella infection.
Factors associated with rapid emergence of zoonotic Bartonella infections.
This study describes 2 Bartonella species in an urban population of raccoons and compares these findings to Bartonella infection in sympatric feral cats (Felis catus).
Serologic testing was completed on paired serum samples for 336 (46%) of 732 febrile patients enrolled; 92 (27%) had serologically confirmed (50) or probable (42) Bartonella infections.
Due to the prior documentation of Bartonella infection, intravenous doxycycline, rifampin, and gentamicin were administered, and total parenteral nutrition was instituted.
These findings suggest that exotic squirrels also might be a potential source of Bartonella infections in humans.
His research interests include development of novel or improved molecular, diagnostic, and culture methods for detection of Bartonella infections in animals and humans.
Molecular epidemiology of Bartonella infections in patients with bacillary angiomatosis-peliosis.
Molecular documentation of Bartonella infection in dogs in Greece and Italy.
Prevalence of Bartonella infection among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with fever.